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  • Writer's pictureMichelle Henderson

Visual Note-Taking: Unleashing the Power of Drawing


Ashton Rodenhiser in front of drawing.
Unleashing the Power

Unleashing the Power of Drawing

Welcome to the world of visual note-taking and creativity, where simple drawings become powerful thinking tools. In this blog, we dive into the inspiring journey of Ashton Rodeniser, a creative entrepreneur passionate about transforming complex ideas into visually understandable language through her company, Mind Eye Creative. Founded in 2014, Mind Eye Creative has interpreted over 2,500 presentations and conversations, showcasing Ashton's unique skill in translating intricate concepts into engaging visual representations.

 

Early Years and Passion for Communication:

Ashton's journey into visual communication finds its roots in her early fascination with language and communication. Originally drawn towards becoming a sign language interpreter, Ashton has always been intrigued by how individuals, particularly children, convey and understand ideas. Her first career involved working with children, nurturing her innate desire to facilitate effective communication and understanding.

 

The Genesis of Mind Eye Creative:

The inception of Mind Eye Creative occurred in 2014, marking Ashton's foray into the world of visual note-taking. Little did she know that her passion for communication would intertwine with her love for drawing, creating a platform to help bridge communication gaps. Mind Eye Creative became a vessel for Ashton's mission – making information more accessible, engaging, and memorable through simple drawing elements.

 

The Power of Visual Note-Taking:

Visual note-taking, also known as sketchnoting, is more than just creating aesthetically pleasing drawings. It's a thinking tool that enhances recall, understanding, and communication. Ashton's approach to sketchnoting involves breaking down the process into simple, learnable elements. From drawing lines to creating arrows and squares, these basic skills form the foundation of a powerful visual language.

 

Teaching the Art of Sketchnoting:

Recognizing the transformative potential of sketchnoting, Ashton established the Sketch Notes School. Her goal is to make this skill accessible to everyone, regardless of their artistic background. The Beginner's Guide to Sketchnoting, published by Ashton, serves as a valuable resource for individuals keen on harnessing the benefits of visual note-taking. The school provides a safe space for beginners to embrace the power of the pen and bring creativity into their note-taking process.

 

The Sketchnoting Process:

Whether Ashton is interpreting presentations in person or virtually, her sketchnoting process involves a delicate balance between listening and visualizing. During live events, she gauges the atmosphere, captures repeated themes, and even engages with the audience to ensure the accuracy of her visual representation. The result is large, intricate sketches that encapsulate the essence of discussions.

 

Adapting to Diverse Environments:

Ashton's sketchnoting journey has taken her to diverse environments, from tech conferences to emotionally charged workshops. Her adaptability and ability to navigate various topics have allowed her to become a trusted visual interpreter. Ashton's clients span different industries, showcasing the universality of visual communication in addressing common human challenges.

 

Reflections on a Unique Career:

Ashton's reflections on her unique career reveal the profound impact of visual communication. From creating memorable moments in emotionally charged workshops to being the visual voice of those who haven't been heard for years, Ashton's journey is a testament to the power of combining creativity and communication.

 

Conclusion:

As we explore Ashton Rodeniser's journey, it becomes evident that sketchnoting is not just an art form – it's a tool for connection, understanding, and empowerment. Whether you're a student, professional, or aspiring sketchnoter, Ashton's story serves as an inspiration to unlock the creative potential within and transform the way we learn and communicate.



Transcript of Episode:

Ashton Rodeniser  :

Hey Michelle. Oh my gosh, those intros are always so funny. I'm like, wow, I sound a lot fancier in words than I do in real life, but thank you for that.

Michelle Henderson 

Well, you are the creative soul my dear, and like I said, and you know what, it's very interesting. Not only do I look at this, the art that you do from a creative point of view, but also learning styles because a lot of us do not listen to a lecture or whatever and be able to really understand it and remember it unless it's very visual. So tell us what's your inspiration behind this all? How did you really think about this and get it started?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, I guess I didn't even understand when I got into this how fundamental communication has been a theme throughout my life. I almost became a sign language interpreter. I almost did that. Yes. And I always worked with children. That was sort of my first career. I really wanted to be a mother when I grew up. So I went and did my formal education with early childhood and I've always been really fascinated with how children communicate and how we can help them with their language. And it wasn't even until a couple years ago after doing this sort of visual communication that I was like, this has been a theme. Helping people communicate their own understanding and their own ideas and kind of helping bridge that gap in this way and then other ways in my life has just been kind of a funny theme. So I think that's sort of the one of me really loving, I think wanting to be a secret artist when I grew up and this sort of beautiful coming together of all things creative and how it can help people communicate and gain clarity and learn and focus and all those other benefits.

I'm sure we'll talk about sort of how I think I really fell in love with this type of communication in particular and how it can make information so much more accessible and engaging and easy to remember.

Michelle Henderson 

Oh, absolutely. And I absolutely love that story and I love how you said that it's very simple and I'm going to show because you have this on your website that you can. Actually, we're getting right into it. So I'm going to show how you can drop, because a lot of us, whenever you're taking notes personally, and then we'll talk about how you do it in front of everybody. But if personally you have to have, don't you think that muscle memory to really understand each symbol and so on your website you do have the symbols that you can practice drawing step by step. And I love this to get in the muscle memory. Is that what you were thinking about when you created this?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, it was kind of a fun side project doing these kind of doodle books to help people because sometimes we think we can't draw, but when you can follow something step by step and then once you've done it once, the chance of you being able to do it again and again and again and just sort of from your memory, the muscle memory part is sort of the beauty and the secret sauce in behind using drawing as a thinking tool. Because when I am teaching people how to do visual note taker, sketch, noting we call it, it's about learning those real basic elements way more basic than what you just shared of just drawing a line and turning that line into an arrow and then turning that line into a square and how you can use really simple core drawing elements that you can learn in probably 15 minutes to help you connect the information on a page to show a flow, to show separation and highlight and things like that. Because when you're doing it for visual note-taking content is still always going to be really important, but how can you do some little visual cues and elements that are really easy to learn? I was just saying in line to help be able to connect that. And I think for me with this as well, it's fixing a problem in the middle. So a lot of times what happens is we hear something, we write it down, we hear something, we write it down, there's no filtering, there's no thinking, there's no deeper understanding. We're just like, here, write here. And by adding in the sketchnoting element or visual note taking element makes you pause while you're listening and try to process a bit deeper and then capture it. Right. So I'm quite a stickler for note taking in terms of having that deeper understanding while you're taking your notes. Because if you don't, then you might as well not take notes at all because you're just listening and you're writing it down and then when you go to reflect on it later, you have no idea what was the most important thing. You don't know what the key ideas were, you don't know how you feel about it, what's going to help you remember it. That whole piece is missing, which is pretty darn important. Right,

Michelle Henderson 

Absolutely. And you reminded me of something as well when I was much younger as an educator and you have to have the continuing education and you take these courses and usually our campus back then would have somebody come in and teach us a concept in education and one time they actually brought a note thing just like what you're describing and the same symbols. And so we had it in front of us while she or he, I can't remember, did the lecturing. And that way we could follow along. And to me, instead of I know it's great to have a facilitator there that draws as well and we're going to show in just a few minutes, but that is another way that you can use something if you're going to be teaching a class of somebody or even kids having that note taking, especially for the younger one, the visualization is awesome.

Ashton Rodeniser 

And I love how even out of all of the courses and classes, I'm sure you took over a period of years that one, you can't remember if it was a guy or a girl or whatever, but you remember how it helped you in that moment. And that just speaks to the power of it for sure.

Michelle Henderson 

Yeah, I was going, how creative is this? They actually gave us a colored copy. It wasn't black and white, so they actually spent the money that ink. Yeah, that's awesome. I absolutely love that. Alright, so now let's talk about what you do whenever you take it. And to me this is fascinating because not only are you listening to what the facilitator, the teacher is talking about, but you're also having to interpret through symbols. Can you kind of talk to us about the process that you go through?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, I love this picture. I call it my graphic recording face. Like my serious, I'm thinking really hard. I swear I'm a nice person face. Usually if I see a camera close by I try to smile. Oh, right, yeah. So it is this song and dance and this balance. So I'm, whether you're doing it personally for yourself or when I'm in a room doing it large, you just shared it's about the listening and I'm trying to make sense of what I'm hearing. I'm trying to connect those dots. So I'm kind thinking when you're doing it for yourself, you're thinking for yourself, what resonates most with me when I'm doing it professionally in a room. I'm trying to also gauge the room, what's resonating most with the room, what keeps being repeated, what was said and you heard, oh, or or clapping or So you're also taking in the vibe and the atmosphere of a space that one in particular I remember was back a few months ago and someone came up to me and they said, oh, could you please add in this part? And I love it when it can be an engaging process in the room. And the thing she told me to include, I was literally just finishing writing it up and it was just this goosebump moment because I felt honored that I heard the right thing in the room to capture and that she came up and validated that it was honestly probably one of the most special moments of my career and the way that it was just the perfect blend of her validating exactly what I had literally just wrote down. So you're trying to balance that space in between of listening and trying to put your own bias aside, which is very impossible to do, but you try your best and listen as a whole of what's coming up for people. Sometimes I'm in rooms where emotions are really high, it's very sensitive topic and it is such a honoring place to be in because I'm just sort of coming in as the outsider, which I really love. But you're also holding some of these things where people have been working on this issue for their whole life. So you want to do it, you want to get it right. So there is a little bit of pressure, but at the end of the day, being able to highlight and showcase what people are saying in a room is just such an honor because sometimes people don't always have that opportunity to literally see and feel like they've been heard in a room in a space. I had a guy one time come up to me and he said, I've worked here for 40 years and no one has ever asked me how I felt about something. So that's a pretty honoring space to be in to be able to hold their words and draw a picture to it. And now in that picture you just shared, when I'm doing it in person, I'm doing it on gigantic pieces of paper and then when I'm doing it online, but it's still in doing it digitally in a Zoom call for example, it's still very important to try to be as present in that space as I possibly can.

Michelle Henderson 

So have you ever been to a conference where you're doing the drawing and everything but you don't understand what's going on? Have you ever come across that aspect of it?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, so my client base is pretty diverse. It's pretty diverse. So most of the situations I'm in, I don't have a real high level of what they're talking about to be honest with you. I work in some software engineering spaces and I'm like, I don't really know exactly what they're saying, but they keep saying the same word over and over again. You're like, that's probably important. It's probably important, but it also, it's this space where when I have the opportunity, I don't always have the opportunity, but when I do, I can say this isn't necessarily all about me. If I capture something that's not quite right or I spelled something wrong or you want to make sure I elaborate on something, I want it to be a collaborative opportunity as well. And most of the time when I'm doing conferences and there's a speaker and a presentation, they have a very clear outline of what is they're trying to get across. So those are pretty, I want to say easy, but they can be easier. But it's more of those situations that you find yourself in where there's more people, there's multiple voices being contributing to whatever it is they're trying to work through. And to be honest with you, because I've worked in so many different fields to this point, a lot of the issues are the same. A lot of the issues are the same people, whether you're a tech or you work for a library or school or in medical, a lot a of the same stuff tends to come up over and over again. And that's how do we work together, how do we hear each other? How do we move the needle forward? It's a lot of the same kind of stuff to be honest with you.

Michelle Henderson 

And I bet you learn a lot. I mean things that you have never even thought that you would learn being an educator. Tim, I'm sure you soak it all in.

Ashton Rodeniser 

Oh yeah, Jerry's fascinating. Yeah, very fascinating to you hear about issues sometimes on the periphery and you think you have an opinion about something and then you spend two full days with the people who've been in that issue their whole lives and you're like, oh, okay. You have completely different understanding of that issue when you hear lived experience, not just an article that was in the news about something bad that happened, right? You're like, oh, I'm hearing this from people, which makes me feel that's an extra bonus because it allows me to have opinions on things and feel really grounded in how I feel about something. Whereas not that I want to get in debates with people, but I'm like, I have heard loved experience for 16 hours. I feel like I can have a pretty solid opinion about this.

Michelle Henderson 

Okay. I'm going to ask you one more question about these topics. I just find it fascinating that what is the favorite, I know that there's so many presentations that you have done, but which one was your favorite?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Oh my goodness. Oh my goodness. I don't even know. I don't know. They're all unique in their own ways. The ones that are more of a facilitated do stand out to me more. I don't know if they would be a favorite, but they stand out. Whereas conferences are great, but they're, they're a little bit more product. There's a speaker, here's a drawing, there's a speaker, there's a drawing. Those don't always stand out as memorable unless the speaker was memorable. Note to anybody who's doing speaking. There's very few that I can count on probably one hand that speakers that stand out to me out of all the thousands that I have done. So it's more of those situations that I was talking about where you're in a room with people and those are definitely the ones that tend to be my favorite just because they're a little bit more soul fulfilling.

Michelle Henderson 

Right. And I'm going to show everybody, I found this on your, I believe it was on Instagram or Facebook, but I love this. I just wanted to show everybody what it can come out to look like and that you did this during a presentation and it's on a big piece of paper. What kind of paper are you using? Is it butcher paper or,

Ashton Rodeniser 

Oh, I can't remember. The weight is, I think I should know this by now, but it is a bit of a heavier paper and I usually get it at a print shop, so I get like 150 foot roll. And this just for context, I think this is three and a half feet wide by maybe eight feet long, something like that. And this one in particular, I did, there was a two day event and I think I created three. So this was a little bit more of a slow burn, this one. Whereas sometimes when I'm in a conference setting, I might create maybe a little bit of a smaller canvas size, a smaller size, but I might create 10 in a day where this one in particular was three over the course of day in almost two full days. Yeah.

Michelle Henderson 

Wow. And how long did it take you to do your craft or was it just an automatic, what did you go through the process of going, I can do this?

Ashton Rodeniser 

So I was introduced 10 years ago, and honestly I've just been doing it ever since. So the one that you just shared was just from a few months ago, so that's like nine and a half years in or something. So to get something that looks that decent, that's nine and a half years of doing this consistently over a period of time. Those first few years are pretty, sometimes you kind of look back and you're like, I can't believe someone paid me to draw that. It's not very good,

Michelle Henderson 

But you know what? But it is probably beautiful because not everybody can do that. And again, the purpose of it is to take notes in a creative way. And I think that's fascinating.

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, it was less more about the, I tried my best and the great thing about it is a lot of times when you show up, people don't have anything to compare you to, because a lot of times it's the first time they've ever experienced it. So whatever you do is amazing. But from a growth perspective, when I look back and go, oh my gosh, I've just grown so much when when you do something, I don't feel like I'm special or unique in the sense of I just dedicated to want to learn how to do it really, really well. And that's 10 years of doing it just consistently. And it was three years of playing around and getting a few clients here and there, and then the last seven years of being full, full time and doing it all the time.

Michelle Henderson 

And I heard somewhere that you don't have an art degree.

Ashton Rodeniser 

No, I do not.

Michelle Henderson 

And I think that's important for people to know because a lot of people think, oh, I can't do it when you can. Don't need that art degree.

Ashton Rodeniser 

No. And I got into this, I've always been very creative name a medium, and I've probably tried it like watercolor, caustic, cross stitching. I met my husband in high school when I was knitting all these different things, but I didn't actually draw a whole lot. I wasn't actually that much of a doodler. So even though very creative, I actually had to really build that skill in the beginning. And I do share some of my early works with people so they can see the difference. I would didn't just come out the one that you shared, just drawing that. Nice. And there's certainly people in my field who draw way better than I do, and they have more of an art background, but I really leaned in on my background and experience as that sort of communication and helping people communicate. So it's not that I wasn't worried about the aesthetics in the beginning, but I think I just leaned on in the value and the power of it. And I knew that the drawing skills would come over time if I just stuck with it enough. And I think that's kind of what maybe got me through those first few years of imposter syndrome and not really sure how am I going to do this. And even though I felt like the drawings weren't so great in the beginning, the response I was getting from people every single time I would do that, it didn't matter how it looked, it still, it was about helping them. And I felt good about that, getting that in the moment. Feedback is pretty darn helpful. Oh,

Michelle Henderson 

Absolutely. Absolutely. So tell us, now you actually, you have a sketch note school. So tell us a little bit about that. What is your objective for the school?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, so we touched on it very briefly in the beginning, but I really believe this way of communicating and learning, and it does not have to be rocket science, and I really think it's such a powerful skill for people to learn. And I knew a few years ago that I was like, I need to figure out a way to teach this. So I am in a bit of a transition of you can still hire me to do it for you, but I also want to get the skillset in as many hands as I possibly can. Like students, professionals, like college kids, like anybody who wants to bring back the power of the pen and make notes in a way that's not just fun. I always forget to add in the word, it's actually fun. And have fun while you're learning and thinking and listening to information and capture in a way that's going to help you from a brain science perspective and also have fun. And it's really does not have to be complicated to learn. It's really anybody can make anything complicated. As I've learned throughout my career, we just tend to overcomplicate everything. And it really, really is an actually very easy skill to learn if it's something that resonates with you to want to learn. So yeah, so I started Sketch Notes School back a few months ago and I published The Beginner's Guide to Sketchnoting a couple months ago just to try to emphasis on the beginner. It was really important to me, and I workshopped it with beta readers over the course of a year and a half to really try to make it as beginner friendly as possible. So the first drawing skill that you learn is how to draw a line. So it's real basic. So if you have an art experience that's bonus, but you absolutely, if you want to benefit from the power of visual note taking and sketch noting, then I'm trying to make it as accessible and barrier free as possible.

Michelle Henderson 

Because it reminded me when you were talking, what do we do when we're either listening or talking to somebody over the phone is we doodle. And so you can kind move that from doodling to more of, like you said, you start with lines or drawing, just moving your pencil around, why not start doing pictures?

Ashton Rodeniser 

So the way that I like to describe sketch noting is you're taking doodles that probably are doing anyways and you're just making them work for you a little bit. Just making them a little bit more purposeful and doodling as a very non-threatening art form is a great way to get introduced into this because a lot of people have a personal experience with doodling. Unfortunately, a lot of people also have a negative experience with it where they got in trouble where it's not in class or it's seen as unprofessional if you were to do it in a meeting. But I'm not much of a STA person, but I'll throw out the one that I do have is doodling can help you retain up to 29% more information. So it's doing the opposite of what you think it's doing, which is distraction. People think, oh, you're doodling, you're distracted, but it's actually helping you stay focused. You're not looking on your phone or you're not thinking about what you're going to have for supper or whatever. You're still listening, but you're doodling. So I like to, just to reiterate the fact that I like to see doodling as this nice first step for people because people, it's, it's pretty accessible. It can really help you from a, you're already starting to get the benefits from a brain science and how we learn perspective, so why not just take what you're doodling anyways and just put that into your note taking to help benefit you even more?

Michelle Henderson 

Right? Oh, I love it. I absolutely love it. Okay, so did we leave anything out that you want to make sure that we do talk about?

Ashton Rodeniser 

That's really a lot of it, to be honest with you. It's just trying to encourage people to get back into, if you do note take, try to get away from doing it on the computer if you can.

Michelle Henderson 

Oh, absolutely.

Ashton Rodeniser 

There is studies around typing notes versus writing notes. And the thing with Sketchnoting too is also you're adding in this, it is a little risky, but you're trusting yourself a little bit more because you don't have to capture everything. Whereas a lot of times when we're listening to something, you're rapid fire just writing everything down and you're missing that understanding part that we talked about. But you're leaving things out on purpose because you're trusting yourself that you're going to remember it by adding a little drawing to it, or you're cutting out filler words and things like that. So it can be very intimidating. And that's why I started to kind of sketch notes school, because it's kind of like what I would've liked to have when I first started out, just this really safe space to just put out some bad drawings in sketch notes and get feedback and get support from people who are in a very similar journey, because you're going to learn in different ways. In my community today, I actually hosted our monthly workshop all about visual metaphors and what's a visual metaphor? How can you use them? And I don't even touch that on that in the book because it's a little bit more advanced. But start to learn about different ways that you can incorporate visuals into what's going to help you even deeper, even deepening that understanding, whether it's for yourself, just for yourself. You don't ever have to show it to anybody or if you want to do it as a professional in a boardroom meeting or something like that.

Michelle Henderson 

I love it. Alright, so one thing before we have the last question is can you give people an inspiration being an intrapreneur using your creativity? What could you tell them?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Oh my gosh. Yeah. I do like the opportunity to talk about my entrepreneur journey because it's such a weird business. It's not like your average like, oh, I'm a social media manager, or I'm like a website designer or something like that. It's quite a unique kind of business that I've been able to actually be quite successful at and be full-time for seven years and raise my small tribe of people doing. And there's two things that I really lean in from a business perspective that I think may or may not be a bit untraditional is one, I really listen to my intuition. So when it's very easy to see all the Facebook ads and all the people telling you to do all the funnelly things and do this and do that and say this on a client call and say that in your proposal or whatever, there's a lot of that out there. And it took me a couple of years to realize I just need to lean in on who I am and show up as Ashton and they're going to get all the value from the service that I provide, but they're also going to get the Ashton experience. And if I don't lean into my intuition and how I'm going to put things together or how I'm going to talk on a client call and who I'm going to reach out to and what does that all look like, I'm not necessarily going to get the people that are the right fit. So on client calls recently, I just feel very brazen. I'm like, I only work with fun people. If you're fun and easy to work with, I will work with you. And then they're almost like, I think I'm easy and fun. I think I'm easy and fun because we don't have time and capacity to be working with people that are not a good fit for you, who just like you're staying up all night worrying about your deliverable or whatever. Nobody has capacity for that and there's someone else out there that's probably a better fit and can handle them or their personalities work a little bit better. And it is a little scary to listen to your intuition. I think sometimes when we're so inundated, especially in an online world of do this funnel and do this thing, and to kind of go, honestly, one of the most responded to emails I ever sent out to my newsletter list was, I hate writing these emails and this is why. And I was doing a launch and it was a thing, and I was like, I don't like doing this. I don't like doing this and that, and this is what I'm trying to tell you and this is why I don't writing these types of emails because they're awkward and they're weird and I just want you to know this thing without trying to sell you on it. And I got such a positive response from people, oh my gosh, this email made me smile. It was so funny. Or I totally relayed, but I had to listen to my intuition for that one because if I want to listen to all the businessy guru people, I'd be like, oh, never send an email like that. And then the second thing that I do is I really relate on experimentation and everything. You can't fail. If everything's an experiment, I'm going to try this thing or I'm going to try that thing, or I'm going to put out this book, or I'm going to try this messaging, or I'm going to talk to this person. And it's all an experiment and you're going to learn something, whether or not it fulfills your hypothesis or not, you're like, you're doing an experiment for a reason because you think it's going to lead to a certain outcome, but if it doesn't lead to that outcome, there's chances are you still learned a very, very valuable lesson that you can take to your next experiment. And yeah, if you experiment, nothing is really a failure. It's all just like a game. So I kind of look at everything as a game. I like to play games with the universe. I'm like, okay, universe, let's play game today. And sometimes on days it's really hard to do that when you're struggling or you have an empty calendar and sometimes it's really hard to do that. But I feel like things come full circle when you're playful and there's not enough fun in business I think sometimes.

Michelle Henderson 

Right?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah.

Michelle Henderson 

Coming from a true creative business teacher, an educator, should I say. Alright, so let's bring the will on for the last question. Let's see what the last question will be.

Ashton Rodeniser 

I'm curious.

Michelle Henderson 

The will decides, oh my gosh, can you but believe this? I mean, it always happens.

Michelle Henderson 

This is so funny. Coming from a teacher was, I mean, it doesn't have to be now. It could be something new that you're learning. So what is your favorite subject?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Subject? I'm also very musical. I would say. I have more training in music than I do in art. My art is very, very, very limited. I've barely taken an art class. I took piano, I took saxophone, I took guitar, and I'm learning how to play the bag pipes right now.

Michelle Henderson 

Oh my gosh.

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah. It's a very hard instrument to learn people, and I'm doing it with my 10-year-old, and she's such a trooper. And I said to her, because I've learned all these different instruments, I said, if you can learn how to play this instrument, you can learn how to play anything. Because it is quite a process. It is quite a process. I don't know if I truly have the lung capacity. I think I need to take up swimming just so I can work on my lung capacity to try to play these bagpipes. So it might be quite a while before she gets on them fully. Quite a beast to overcome. But yeah.

Michelle Henderson 

Well, I totally understand because my husband is a firefighter and has been for, gosh, 35 years. Yeah. So we listened to the bagpipes quite a bit. Do

Ashton Rodeniser 

You? Wow.

Michelle Henderson 

Yes. So funerals, they always have somebody playing the bagpipes or during award ceremonies, they'll bring them in as well. I love that. There's always one guy that does it.

Ashton Rodeniser 

That's funny. The bagpipe dude of the community. I love that.

Michelle Henderson 

And I know there's a significant with firefighters, and I'm not really for sure pass through centuries, but yeah, so if you get into it and you get talent or you understand what you're doing, contact fire departments.

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, I'm sure. Well, where I live is Nova Scotia. It's the province of Nova Scotia in Canada, which actually means New Scotland. So there's a lot of Scottish heritage here. But it's funny, it is a bit of a dying bagpipes, a bit of a dying art. When I was younger, there'd be parades, there'd be like 10 bagpipe bands, and now you're lucky if there's one. So it is a bit of a dying art form around here. So I'm hoping in my small way that I can help try to revive it. But it's quite an interesting instrument to learn so

Michelle Henderson 

Well, where is the favorite place that you want people to reach you? Where do they need to go?

Ashton Rodeniser 

Yeah, I guess there's kind of two ways. So pick your poison. If you're like, oh, I really want to learn how to sketchnote, this sounds like an interesting thing that I might want to try over for myself. You can go to Sketchnote school. I got free newsletter. I going to send out a sketch note tip every Saturday joining my community is on there, grabbing the PDF version or paperback or Amazon or whatever. So all things, learning how to sketch note you can find there. And then if you're like, oh, I have a conference or a meeting or something coming up in person or virtually that you want to chat about, you can go to minds eye creative.ca. So all things per Session, go Creation is there. Yeah.

Michelle Henderson 

Well, I want to thank you. You are such a creative soul and everybody I'm sure has learned quite a bit from you, but I hope that everybody enjoyed this episode. And just remember, use that creativity, use your intuition and experiment a little bit in life. Don't worry about failure because it's all in the experimenting. Right? All right, guys, I will see you next week. Thanks so much for listening.

 

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