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  • Writer's pictureMichelle Henderson

Understanding Burnout: Clint Callahan


Man sitting on bench
Self-Care & Burnout

I'm thrilled to introduce Clint Callahan, a licensed therapist, social worker, and life coach with a unique perspective on burnout. Clint has an incredible life story and a wealth of experience helping others manage their mental health and well-being. Let's dive into our enlightening conversation and learn from Clint's journey and expertise.

 

Clint's Early Life and Journey to Therapy

 

Clint Callahan was born three and a half months premature, weighing just one pound, 15 ounces. His early life was a fight for survival, and his parents were uncertain day-to-day if he would make it. This challenging beginning left Clint with a sense of being special, a heavy burden for a child to bear.

 

Clint's school years were tough. He was bullied, which led to anger issues and anxiety. At around 12 years old, his parents put him in therapy, which was a turning point in his life. Therapy introduced him to the language of feelings and emotions, a crucial tool that wasn't readily available to boys growing up in the late seventies and early eighties. This early experience sparked his interest in understanding human behavior, eventually leading him to pursue a master's degree in clinical social work.

 

From Burnout to Breakthrough

 

Clint's path wasn't straightforward. After losing his mother at 28, he spiraled into grief and depression, leading to profound burnout. This experience taught him that burnout is not just about being overworked; it's a systemic collapse affecting various areas of life. Clint emphasizes that burnout often starts with social disconnection, progresses to self-care neglect, and eventually impacts professional and personal relationships.

 

Recognizing the complexity of burnout, Clint decided to delve deeper into understanding and addressing it. He found that conventional approaches weren't enough and began developing his own methods to help others.

 

Clint's Approach to Managing Burnout

 

Clint's approach to managing burnout is holistic and practical. Here are some key strategies he shared:

 

1. Box Breathing: This simple breathing technique helps calm the nervous system. Breathe in for four seconds, hold for four seconds, breathe out for four seconds, and hold again for four seconds. Repeat this four times.

 

2. Journaling: Writing down your thoughts and feelings helps move them from the emotional part of the brain to the logical part. This can be done in just a few minutes a day.

 

3. Physical Exercise: Moving your body helps redirect adrenaline and other stress hormones, allowing for clearer thinking and better emotional regulation.

 

4. Self-Reflection: Clint practices brief meditation and journaling three times a day to stay aware of his emotions and body sensations, helping him manage stress before it escalates.

 

Advice for Parents and Educators

 

For parents and educators dealing with children experiencing bullying or other challenges, Clint recommends finding a good therapist outside the school environment. It's important for children to have a safe space to express their feelings and learn to identify and manage their emotions.

 

Final Thoughts

 

Clint's journey and insights remind us that self-care is essential. He emphasizes that giving yourself even 15 minutes a day for self-care can make a significant difference. This small investment of time, just 1.1% of your day, can help you prioritize yourself and improve your overall well-being.

 

Connect with Clint

 

You can find Clint Callahan on Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok at [Small Changes, Big Impact](https://www.smallchangesbigimpact.net). He also offers a comprehensive course on managing burnout, which includes his book, master classes, and practical worksheets.

 



Transcript of Episode:

 

Michelle Henderson :

Clint, I am so excited to have this conversation with you.


Clint Callahan :

Thank you for having me.


Michelle Henderson :

How are you doing today?


Clint Callahan :


I'm doing great.

Michelle Henderson :

Oh, well, good, good, good, good. Well, whenever I was looking at your life story, I thought, Ooh, I've got to have em on because I've been burned out. Everybody else has been burned out because that's one thing that you specialize in, but I always love to listen to other people's story, so we learn all about you. So how did you decide to go into this area? What kind of led your life journey to be who you are today?


Clint Callahan :

Well, I was born about three and a half months premature, so I ate about one pound, 15 ounces. I was born, so ever since then, basically, it was about almost 48 years ago now. So they didn't know you can pick up babies, hold babies, all that kind of stuff back then that they were that premature. And it was basically a fight to survive pretty much for the first three and a half months of my life. My parents didn't know from one day to the next if I was going to be alive or not. And so from there, I was always told, well, you're special. You're put here for a reason. God had a plan for you, all that kind of stuff, which for a kid is kind of a heavy burden to bear because I was like, I didn't have anything to do with it.

I just stayed alive somehow. I don't really know. And so from there I went into, it was elementary school. Elementary school, and just schooling in general, elementary, middle, and high school was rough. I was bullied a lot as a kid, and that really gave me a lot of anger issues and a lot of just control stuff. And so that really kind of came about where my parents decided to put me in therapy when I was around 12. I was just so angry all the time. I didn't feel like I had control and I had a lot of psychosomatic or somatic symptoms of just anxiety and stress and all those kinds of things. And so that led me to get introduced to therapy and language and that there's actually words for these stuff that I was feeling because I was a boy growing up in the late seventies, early eighties, there weren't really lots of feeling words floating around, not like there are today.


Michelle Henderson :

Right,


Clint Callahan :

Right. So that's part of it where that made me start to fall in love with, well, why do we think this way? Why do we act this way? Why do some people bully? Why do some people not? What is it about all this stuff that makes us do the things that we do? And I fell in love with that. And so I went on to get my master's degree in clinical social work, and I've been a licensed therapist and social worker now for 24 years now this year that I've been doing. Wow. I decided to go into life coaching about a year ago, and the reason how I got into burnout specifically is after my mom passed away when I was 28, it led me down to big old grief, grief and depression spiral. That then led to profound burnout, and that's when I learned that.

So my mom passed away. I left the profession for a little while. I went into real estate. Then 2008 happened and we lost everything. And I had to go live with my in-laws with wife and our three month old newborn son, and I was the most burned out I've ever felt in my entire life. And so I did practice before preached. I went to therapy, I took medication, I took antidepressants, I did all those things, but everything they kept telling me about burnout didn't seem to sit right because it wasn't getting better. I kept feeling stuck. And so what I found was that burnout is something that's really different compared to what people think it is because when we think about burnout, we often think about burnout from the workplace perspective where I'm overworked and so I'm burned out. And really, burnout is not just about work.

Burnout is a systemic collapse in various areas of your life, and usually it starts with just your social habits. Are you still connecting with people? Are you getting to feel or think, I can't talk to people, I can't be around people at work. I don't want to go to meetings. I don't want to go to these after hours things because I feel like I'm kind of a burden or I'm a drag. So you start wanting to have more time alone and you start to do these different things that are separating yourself from other people. And that's one of the first signs of burnout, which burnout isn't just burnout. For me, it was a combination of depression, anxiety, and just complete and total negative. And so then the second thing that I started to go through was self-care neglect. So I started not showering as much.

I started wearing the same clothes, didn't shave as much, just started just disengaging from caring for myself. I didn't go to the gym anymore. I didn't really have the energy to do anything. And so that was the second stage that I got into. And then of course then started to disconnect me from my relationships because who wants to be around someone that's depressed and smelly and not taking care of themselves and kind of in a bad mood all the time? Then of course, my own thinking was, well then I'm a burden to these people, so I don't want to tell them what's going on with me. I don't want to let them know how I'm feeling because I don't want to be a burden to them. They have enough stuff going on. And then that of course, then finally began to impact my work. And that's when that was like, of course, that's usually when the wake up call happens.

Oh no, if I don't straighten up, I'm going to lose my job, which means I'm going to lose money. And if I lose money, then I'm not going to have a place to live and I'm going to end up dead under a bridge in a week. And that's the way it tends to go. Right? And so from all that, it led to this moment when I just had to decide, is this who I want to be? Is this the kind of husband I want to be? Is this the kind of father I want to be? Is this the kind of man I want to be? And I had to begin figuring out how to make changes.


Michelle Henderson :

I love that. And I love your story where you started when you were just born and everything. But it's interesting, it tells a lot about you that you really listened to your behavior. You knew that there was a way to get help, which your parents showed you. And a lot of 12 year olds would say, I'm not going to therapy. So good for you for saying, okay, I'm going to try it. And so I think that's the number one thing is to listen and to go get help and try the things that the therapist tells you to do. Because like you said, you get really depressed, but you know what you sound like. You know how doctors are their worst patients. It sounds like you're your best patient.


Clint Callahan :

It is one of those things where it's like, but at the same time I was, but I wasn't because I still needed an outside perspective. So I still went to therapy. I still was on prescription medication. I was on Labutrin for about five years while trying to dig myself out of all these things because for me, my burnout wasn't just about burnout. My burnout was a combination of burnout and grief and loss and all those kind of things that was compounded. And that's the thing when people hear burnout, they think, oh, it's just about work. But burnout is a compounded thing. It often is grief, anxiety. The thing that people don't know about grief is grief is not just because someone dies. Grief also is because of the loss of an idea, the loss of identity, the loss of the way that you thought things were supposed to be. But yet, somehow you got to this point and your life hasn't changed. But at this point, it was supposed to be this magical change. It's like when you reach the top of this goal and it's like, okay, I reached the goal. Where's the lightning bolt of change?

Come on, I reached it. Where's the thing that says you've made it anybody?

Am I talking to myself here? And that's how you feel. And so recognizing those things and understanding that stuff, and really just taking the time and space to slow down and look at what's going on with you, and really going back to that basics of it all starts with us. And that's what we often don't do because we often are trained and the way we think about the world, at least the way I thought about the world was I have to put everybody else first. But the problem is putting everybody else first doesn't work to heal you. It only works to make you feel more isolated and more alone and more misunderstood. So the first person that you need to have a relationship with that's healthy and functional and good is your stuff.


Michelle Henderson :

I love it. Okay, so if you had to go back and talk to yourself as a 12-year-old, it's like, why would I, right? What would you say to your 12-year-old self.


Clint Callahan :

Play more video games? No, that's not right. I would tell them that even though it seems dark right now, even though it seems hard right now that just keep doing what you're doing, that there's going to be ups and there's going to be downs, but that life is ups and downs and that the secret is that nobody wants you to know is that we are all making it up as we go along. There's one thing I've learned doing this work for the last 23 to 24 years now, is that we are all making it up as we go along. Human beings naturally are reactionary creatures. We can't foretell the future. We don't know what's going to happen next. So all we can do is react. So that's why if you have the ability to slow down, to take that breath, to give yourself a couple seconds to analyze the fear story that you tell yourself just before the interaction happens, then you are able to actually make better choices.

And that's one of the things that I really like to teach people is the first thing that people need to understand is that we're 300,000 plus years of was the last major change in anthropological evidence that we changed as human beings about 300,000 years ago. Since then, there have been no updates, no hardware, no software updates. And so because of that, we are still stuck in 150,000 year old fear-based model of everything is out to get us. And that is the biological piece of fear. And that's the thing that people don't recognize is fear has two parts, the biological piece, which is 80%, which is the neck down body stuff, because your body tells you what's going on in the world and whether you're safe or not. And if your body thinks you are not safe, it then changes the way you think. It then changes what the story is that your brain is telling you.

And so if you can get control of your body first, then that then changes the story that's happening in your brain. And the most simple thing that you can do to change the way your body is reacting to any situation is to slow down and to breathe, because breathing is the only automatic system that we have the ability to influence and to change. And the most effective breathing backed by science, which because I love science stuff, is box breathing. And box breathing is the most simple process that there is. As you breathe in and hold for four seconds, you breathe out and hold empty for four seconds, and then you breathe in for a new hold for four seconds, and you do that four times. And what that does is on a body level, it tells your parasympathetic nervous system, which is where that ancient fear stuff lives.

There is no physical danger. You're not going to die in this moment to our body. The fear story, it always ends in our death, our physical demise. And so then of course, our mental story says the same thing. Just think about how it is when you're sitting at work and you go to work first thing in the morning and you turn on your computer and you see an email from your boss and it says, Hey, I need to talk to you this afternoon at one o'clock. So you're sitting there all of a sudden going, oh no. They found out about that one thing that I think I forgot to do, but I don't remember if I actually did it or not. And you start to concoct this story of where you're going to go in, they're going to yell at you, you're going to get fired, and your whole life is over, and you have to now sit with that for the next five hours, and that's going on inside of you for the next five hours.


Michelle Henderson :

I thought I did that a lot.


Clint Callahan :

But if you were to stop and box, breathe, and then think about this story that you're telling yourself, and then go and do something to change where your blood is flowing, because when you're sitting still adrenaline lives in your stomach, which is why your stomach feels so acidic and bad. It stays in your heart and your lungs, which is when it's beating really hard and feels like your heart's going to jump out of your chest or you can't catch your breath and it stays in your brain. And the thing about adrenaline in the human brain is it's the most amazing thing. It actually slows down time because it speeds up our brain by about a factor of 10 because it's designed for us to be able to think faster and dodge if we're being attacked by a tiger or a bear or something like that.

But yet in that moment, we're sitting still, now we feel like we're freaking out and in this panic, adrenalized fear mode, and we feel like it's taking, I must have been sitting here for 20, 30 minutes and it's been like two minutes. Because you're so in that fear mode, your brain is basically super hyper aware and hyper alert. And that's why slowing down and breathing and checking the story and then doing just a bit of physical exercise to change where the adrenaline is in your body, and that's just getting up and doing some speed walking, doing some power walking, just get your heart rate up a little bit to get your adrenaline somewhere else. And that allows you to then start to think clearly again. Because when you're stuck in the feeling part of your brain, you're not thinking clearly because feelings are not logical.

And they do a really good job pretending that they're the fact, but not the fact. And that's the stuff that we get stuck in. That's that cycle, which is why if you can begin to break the body stuff first, then the story stuff doesn't follow. And then you can actually be calm. And then when you go see your boss in the afternoon, you're in a calm, relaxed space. And then you can find out, oh, oh, actually no, I did good. They're going to give me a raise, or whatever's going to happen because I did a good job, because I do good work. And it's those things. But we often jump to the fear story first.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. And during the story, what you said was so true because whenever I started public speaking, you, oh my gosh, that fear and you want to run away, and that adrenaline drops in. And my dad used to be a public speaker and he said, I'll tell you one word of ice. When that happens, it's like you said, speed walk due to that speed walk before you go on stage and get that adrenaline through your system. It's there for a reason, and then use it as you speak so that you are so much more effective. And then you'll get that self-confidence and yes, breathe. Because what do you do when you get on stage?


Clint Callahan :

You either breathe so fast that you then lock your knees and pass out, or you don't breathe enough and you pass out.


Michelle Henderson :

Absolutely. And they're going, what happened? And I know that I've run into so many people who find out that they are stuck in that fear-based, something that, like what you said happened in childhood and they didn't realize what was going on until they started getting sick physically. So what is something that somebody can say, you know what that's going on? What is one symptom that they can really see whenever that starts happening? And they can say, oh, it's the fear.


Clint Callahan :

So for a lot of people, it really comes down to basically, I usually tell people, so my practice that I still do to this day to help me manage all that stuff is I basically meditate for three minutes and then I journal for two. And then I do that three times a day before breakfast, just before lunch and just after dinner. And because when people think, well, only three minutes of meditation, that's not enough stuff to do anything. Well, you're not meditating to try to find enlightenment. You're meditating just to see what your brain is telling you, what the story is right then and there. So by doing that, you're also becoming body aware because if you can get aware of your body, of when you're anxious, when you know that you tend to get anxious, you can figure out what are the symptoms just before the big symptoms.

For me, I start getting a little bit sore right here, right here above my shoulders. And then my stomach starts to get a little bit gurgly, and then I know I'm starting to get anxious. But those are the very first symptoms of that. So when I know that when this starts getting a little bit sore and this starts getting a little bit bubbly, I need to slow down. I need to take a breath, I need to take a step back, and I need to analyze what is the thing that I'm afraid of right now? What is the fear story that I'm telling myself? Because the fear story we often tell ourself is somehow this is going to lead to embarrassment, which will then lead to people disowning us and getting kicked out of the tribe, which then that means that we're not going to be able to survive, which then means we're going to of course be dead within a week because that's what happens.

That is still the most ancient thing inside of us. That being exiled, being ostracized is the greatest fear we have as a human because that was the defacto death sentence literally for 298,000 years and is still going on in some parts of the country and in some different religions where that creates that fear that just, oh, it's just such a deep fear. But if you can figure out what your body symptoms are for the beginning of the fear story, you can then head it off by breathing and changing the way that your body begins to process the moment, because perception is reality. So if you perceive that this thing is going to harm you, then that is exactly how you'll act. If you perceive that everything is going to be okay, then that's how you'll act. It's amazing how what we think is going to happen actually ends up happening. We are our best and worst enemy. That's why the self-fulfilling prophecy is reality. And people hate it when I say that, but I'm like, no, that's what happens when you believe something strongly enough, you act as if it's already happened, and then for some reason it does weird how that works.


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah, and it's so interesting. But you don't see it when you're going through it. Nope. I've got to ask you too. Okay. So as a parent, and I was also an educator or as a teacher, so what can you tell parents that their child is either going through bullying or something at school and they're beginning to see things and their behavior? What would you tell them?


Clint Callahan :

I would tell them don't hesitate to have them go find a good therapist to have someone they can talk to that has nothing to do with the situation. It shouldn't be someone at the school. It needs to be someone completely outside of the situation because then they may actually feel safe enough to have a conversation. It may take a couple of weeks to build that trust, so they'll begin to talk about what's going on and how they're feeling. I remember when I started with therapy, the first thing that they did was because I didn't really have language for what I was feeling, what I was even going through. And so they did the 50 faces sheet where it gave you all these different faces with different expressions, with the name of it underneath it. And they're like, just tell me what you're feeling right now.

You can just point to the ones that you think you're feeling. And it was like they did that with me for the first two to three months of the sessions, just so I could even begin to identify what's going on inside of me. Because that's the thing is, especially for young boys, we are taught still not to really have deep emotions about things. Boys don't cry, pick yourself up, that kind of thing. That's getting better, but it's still a very big prevailing thing that happens. And so by teaching them just the basic understanding of what's going on inside of them, that it's okay to have different feelings, but also there's a right and wrong way to express them because boys still genetically speaking. When we have strong emotions, our first instinct is to get angry about it and to hit something or to do something like that because it's a genetic thing.

Even now I'm 47, and if I get frustrated at something when I'm trying to fix something and it's not working, my brain's like, you should hit that. And I'm like, but it's broken. If I hit it, it's going to be more broken. Why would I do that? And it's like, oh, well, you'll feel better if you do that. And it's like, yeah, but no, because I'll just take the thing that I'm trying to fix, and that's the stuff that we do. And I'm like, I'm 47 years old. I'm almost 48. I should know better by now. And I do, but yet I still get that same stuff as everybody else. And that's part of the process is there is no capital T truth, there is no capital a answer with stuff. Everybody has opinions, everybody has ideas, everybody has ways of doing things, but the more tools you collect, and I've been lucky enough and privileged enough to talk to probably six or 7,000 people over the course of my career so far, where every single person I talk to gives me deeper insight into myself, gives me deeper insight into human nature.

It gives me deeper insight into the way that people function, the way people look at things. And I also, I just love to read stuff about this. And so it helps me to learn and figure out this is what is necessary in order to help you figure out what works for you. There is no one size fits all. That's why the book that I wrote is basically like 131 pages. I got this one. So the book that I wrote, it's like 131 pages, how to Be Burnout in 15 minutes a day. And what it is, is this isn't just about burnout. This is more a manual just about all the aspects of burnout and different ways and things you can do to manage your emotions so that you can have burnout go away. Because burnout is not just about work, burnout is about life. Let's face it. Life is a series of micro burnouts every second of every day. I can't tell you how many times I go home and I'm like, really? More dishes? We just do those. Really? I got a vacuum again. Really? I just do that a couple of days ago. Really? We got to clean the toilets. Really? I got to walk the dog. Really? My kids are hungry again. Really? I have enough stuff going on because life, it's a grind. Sorry, that shocks anybody, but life is a grind,


Michelle Henderson :

Right? Absolutely. And I like how you said that 15 minutes a day. So you already talked about the box breathing and the meditation. Can you tell us another technique that you can do?


Clint Callahan :

Sure. So what I call this my emotional management plan, and this is where I take where you're attacking the strong emotion from three different sections. And so the first part is box breathing. The second part is then doing just about a minute or two of journaling to pull the story out of your head. Because when you pull the story out of your head, it's going from the emotional part of your brain to the logical part of your brain, and you're putting it on the page. And then that allows you then to go and then do the physical exercise piece. And then you take that and you come back and you read the story. If you still believe the story, then rank it, rank this story on a scale of one to five. If it's two or above, do it again. Breathe some more. Go do a little more exercise, write some more.

Do these things Again, until you get to a point where you realize that the story that you're telling yourself is not reality. Because most of the stories that we tell ourselves, if we told them to anybody else out loud, they would look at us. Why do you believe that? That doesn't even make any sense. And we're like, what do you mean? It makes perfect sense in my head. And that's part of the process, right? So it takes about five, six minutes to do that plan. But what it does is it attacks these strong feelings you're having, be it anxiety, be it depression, be it burnout from three different ways. It attacks it from the psychological, it attacks it from the physiological, which is your endocrine system, and from the physical, which is moving your blood through your body so that it changes where the chemicals are living in your body.

And by attacking it from those three different spots, you get back to normal. You get back to logic, you get back to not stuck in your emotions much, much faster. And by doing those things, it gives you the ability to move through pretty much any situation and not let it feel like it's consuming you. The worst feeling is when you get out of a situation, you're like, I could have handled it so much better if I only would've could have. Why didn't I? Just because hindsight is 2010, right? It's way better than 2020. Hindsight is 2010. You can see 97 million ways that you could have done something so much better. Instead of giving yourself grace and reminding yourself, I did the best I could with the information I had at the time. If you can say, yes, I did that. Give yourself a break. What else can you do if you got a whole bunch of information in the meeting and from the speaking from whatever you were doing? And then afterwards, well, now you can make changes for the next time. You have to go through that if you give yourself the grace and not condemn yourself for not being perfect. Sorry to tell you, I've been, I've probably talked a thousand, 7,000 people in the course of just my career and probably spent around 10, 15,000 people in the course of my life. Haven't met perfection yet. Well, except for my wife. But don't let her know that


Michelle Henderson :

I love it. Absolutely love it. And just like you said, you are not alone. There are other people you can go to for help. Are you ready for the last question?


Clint Callahan :

Yes.


Michelle Henderson :

All right. Let's bring on the wheel. Ooh,


Clint Callahan :

Wheel a fortune. Okay.


Michelle Henderson :

I know. That's exactly what it looks like. Alright, whoever invented this was a genius.


Clint Callahan :

I love it.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh wow. Okay, now, yes. So what is your favorite number and why?


Clint Callahan :

Well, actually I would have to say 15 minutes. 15. And the reason why 15 for me was so important is because when I created and came up with the system, I was basically a brand new parent. This is when I was completely burned out. This is when I had a three month old. This is when I had to begin making these changes in my life. And of course, as everyone knows, when you're a new parent, you're lucky if you have three to five minutes at a time to just be styling, just to be still and be quiet and be calm. And I was able to carve out at least three times a day in the beginning of this to give myself a couple of minutes to stop and reorient and realign and find that through line throughout the course of my day to be and to just have a life again, to be in myself, to recognize where I wanted to go and what I wanted to do.

And so 15 for me just means so much because everybody can find 15 minutes. I don't care if you do one minute, 15 times a day, I don't care if you do seven and a half minutes twice a day, three, five minute times, five, three minute times. Take time for yourself so that you can prioritize you. Because if you don't, nobody will. And that is where all of this has to start. If you don't prioritize yourself, it is not being selfish. I know that's what society likes to say. It's not selfish. It's self care. So giving yourself 15 minutes a day, which is literally 1.1% of a 24 hour day, are you saying you are not worth 1.1% out of an entire day to give yourself a moment to just stop and breathe and become who you want to become?


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, I love it. Oh my gosh. All of that. What's your favorite number? That's wonderful. So where can everybody reach you? What's your favorite form of social media or whatever? Sure.


Clint Callahan :

Well, you can actually find me on Facebook, Instagram, and TikTok. And it's at Small Changes, big impact dot the number four and the Letter U where you can also find me online at small changes big impact.net. And there you can find my book and you can find, I also have a course there where it's like 50 bucks a month where you can actually have access to my book, a bunch of master classes. And I turned my book into a 14 week course with worksheets and everything to help you process through all these things. And if you want to, you can even reach out and just talk to me. Just reach out to me on social media. I'm more than happy to engage in conversation.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, I love it. And thank you so much for sharing your expertise. It was wonderful to hear everything. Before we go, I want you to think of one word, any word that comes to mind that you want to leave the audience with.


Clint Callahan :

I would have to say self-care. Okay.


Michelle Henderson :

Alright, everybody. You heard that. So this week, your challenge for 15 minutes a day is to find some type of self-care, and you're going to feel so much better when you do. All right guys, I will see you next week.

 

 

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