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  • Writer's pictureMichelle Henderson

Transforming Trauma into Triumph: John Giordano



Unbreakable spirit
Resilient Recovery

A Story of Transforming Trauma into Triumph


John Giordano, an addiction, trauma, and recovery expert, among his many titles, was a guest on Inspire Your Essence. With over 30 years in the field, John is a pioneer in holistic addiction treatment, developing innovative therapies that have become standard care. His personal journey from a challenging past to long-term recovery fuels his dedication as a professional.


His message resonates with the importance of spirituality in recovery, emphasizing kindness, honesty, and self-improvement. His story begins with a childhood shadowed by familial ties to organized crime and personal trauma. Despite these challenges, John found solace in martial arts, which steered him away from the gang life and towards a path of discipline.

 

His journey into adulthood was marked by struggles with addiction and brushes with the law, but a pivotal moment came during a spiritual awakening in treatment. It was a turning point that led him to dedicate his life to helping others navigate the path to recovery.

 

John's resilience and determination shine through as he shares the highs and lows of his entrepreneurial ventures in the addiction treatment industry. From starting with just $300 to eventually selling a treatment center for $45 million, his story is one of transformation against all odds.

 

But John's mission goes beyond financial success. He's committed to changing the way addiction treatment is approached, advocating for a comprehensive approach that addresses physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. His innovative treatments, including the integration of psychedelics and holistic therapies, offer hope to those struggling with addiction.

 

In his book, "How to Beat Your Addictions and Live a Quality Life," John draws from his own experiences and insights gained from hundreds of interviews to provide practical guidance for overcoming addiction. He emphasizes the importance of intention, therapy, and support in the recovery journey.

 

Today, John continues to inspire through his podcasts, lectures, and contributions to the field of addiction recovery. His latest venture into the world of psychedelic medicine promises to challenge conventional beliefs and offer new hope for those seeking healing.

 John leaves us with a powerful message: "Never give up on your dreams, never let go of your passions, and especially never give up on yourself or the God of your understanding." His story serves as a beacon of hope for anyone facing adversity, reminding us that transformation is possible, no matter the circumstances.




 Original Transcript of Interview (Before Editing)


Michelle Henderson :

I am Michelle, and today we're honored to have John Giordano an addiction, trauma and recovery expert, and he's got lots of letters with his name. He is A-M-A-C-D-H-L-C-A-P and certified hypnotherapist, author and entrepreneur as our guest with over 30 years in the field. John is a pioneer in holistic addiction treatment, developing innovative therapies that have become standard care, a testament to resilience. John's personal journey from challenging past to long-term recovery fuels his dedication as an accomplished professional. He holds multiple certifications, authored books, and contributed to scientific research and founded the highly award g and g holistic addiction treatment. Join us as we dive into John's profound insights on addiction and recovery and about his inspirational story that he has about his life. I know you will be inspired. Let's bring him on. Hello. Hello.


John Giordano :

Hi. And thank you so much for inviting me on to share information, hopefully to help people and motivate them to find their true path.


Michelle Henderson :

And you know what, John? I absolutely am thrilled that you are there and here and I'm so glad that you said yes to the program. I know you're going to help so many people that are really needing like the hope in their lives and know that they are not alone. Because anytime we hear somebody's inspirational story, it makes us go, you know what? I can do that. I can be like him. So John, why don't you start about telling us about your inspirational story. How did you get started on this journey?


John Giordano :

Okay, well, first of all, I'd like to tell your audience that there are no coincidences. If you're listening to this podcast, that means you were meant to listen to this. To me, spirituality is the foundation for any recovery program, any kind of life worth living, not religion. I'm talking about spirituality, learn to be kind instead of right. Do your best not to lie. Cheetos, steal help people less fortunate than you help yourself to grow and become a better human being. Things like that. So my story starts, it's a kind of a sorted past. My family was like a mafia family. My uncle was a hit man. My father was a heroin dealer and my uncle and my grandfather was a shylock. Those are people that loan you money and if you don't pay, you wind to one way or the other. I'll put it that way.

Anyway, I only went to the ninth grade and when I was eight years old, my father went to jail for four years. So I grew up without a dad during those formidable years, and at when I was eight and a half, I got molested by some boys in the neighborhood and then when I was nine, I got molested by my babysitter. She was 14, and that really traumatized me, especially with the boys and then with the girl. And it really did a shadow over my life for many, many years. And I wasn't sure if I was straight, I was gay, or even if that mattered or maybe I had an evil inside of me and I went to the priest and I asked him to take this devil out of me and all this kind of stuff. Anyway, I'm not going to go in detail in the book because I want you guys to look at this book and get, it's to help motivate you and to show you no matter what your education, no matter what kind of family you come from, no matter if you are a drug addict or alcoholic or suffer from depression or anxiety, there is hope.

And what you really need to understand is that you have to be willing to put the effort in. Even though it may seem hopeless, it may seem like it won't work, okay? But it's like practicing anything. If you go to the gym and work out for a month, it doesn't mean that now that you worked out for a month, that's going to be in shape for the rest of the year. Okay? So you got to be consistent, okay? And you got to keep practicing until you get better and better and better at it, and you will get better.

For instance, when I was about 10, I got into gangs when I was 12, 13, 14. Somehow I got into karate. It's in the book. I'm not going to go through all the details. I fell in love with the martial arts that got me out of the gangs. That really helped me on my journey. I didn't drink, I didn't do drugs back then when I was a teenager. Matter of fact, if I did drink, I would throw up so I wouldn't drink. Then when I was 19, 20, I met a girl and my uncle threw my wedding for me, and my family was a bunch of Racketeers, really, and my new bride was a Jewish girl and they wanted her to marry a Jewish boy, and of course we're Italians and we're not Jewish, but they found my family. They liked them, and they're good family. It was just little, don't mess with them, that's all.

Anyway, so what happened was one side of the room you have the bride and the other side of the room you have the grooms, relatives and friends. Well, on the bride side, they had lawyers and doctors and guys with pens. On the other side you had rocketeer guys with guns. So it was an interesting mix of people. And then the caterer insulted my uncle in front of the family. So he killed them the next morning. So my bride and I had to leave town real quick. The police were coming over to my grandmother's house, and that's that part of the journey. Then I said I would never grow up like my family, and of course I did. I used to sell drugs. I used to do collection work for the smugglers. I used to teach one of the cartels bodyguards in Columbia, self-defense. I did all kinds of selling drugs, all kinds of nefarious, different things.

Anyway, eventually life turned to garbage because when you do drugs, that's what happens. And my family did an intervention on me, which was kind of comical. I'm wondering who's doing an intervention on them. And anyway, they wanted me to go to treatment. My mother said she'll never talk to me again. So that's what I did. I went to treatment and there's a whole bunch of stories behind all that also. And then when I went to treatment, I had a spiritual awakening in treatment. I was the most angry patient. I was always wanting to leave. I never emptied my suitcase. I used to just pull clothes out of it. I always had my suitcase going to the elevator ready to leave. Then they would pull me back and talk with me and tell me to stay and all this kind of stuff. Then they asked me in group to share my secrets or my, what's bothering me.

I told 'em I'd have to kill him. So I was just a nasty guy, and it was Christmas Eve or it was going to be Christmas Eve, and I wanted to go home for Christmas. I was in treatment December 4th until then, and they wouldn't let me go. I got really angry, but I didn't get angry, just I got Rachel and I would go in and punch the door, and I remember my therapist telling me, Hey John, do you ever pray on your knees? I said, look, I'm a recovering Catholic. I got cancer calluses on my knees. Are you kidding me? So he said, no. What about humility? I said, oh yeah, God, don't listen because I'm not preying on my knees. Give me a break. I told him. But anyway, it was in my head and I was in a lot of pain and anguish, and I started to clear up and realize how I hurt my family, how I hurt myself.

When you're doing drugs and alcohol, you're in a fog. You think everything's about you, and it's not about anybody else, and we blame everybody but ourselves. So what happened was I wanted to get my knee down, so I went to get my knee down. I couldn't get it down, and it was kind of weird, and I finally pushed my knee down. Then I pushed my other knee down. Then I said, whoever's out there, God, energy aliens, whatever, please take this away from me and I'll do whatever you want me to do. Well, let me tell you something, Michelle. A really weird thing happened. All of my anger left, and I don't know about you or anybody else out there. My stuff don't leave so quick. So what happened was I tried to get it back, but it wouldn't come back, and that's when I called my spiritual awakening in group.

That was one of 'em. I had a couple and eventually I got out. I got divorced after a year. They said, don't make any decisions. I wind up being homeless. I had no money. I only went to the ninth grade. I had no really good education or anything like that, no direction. Karate was my life. I did a lot of good things with the karate. I did shows and all kinds of stuff, but when it came to a career and stuff like that, I didn't have anything. I had real low, but you would never know because it's like a nice mask that we wear. And anyway, so what wind up happening is my friend owned this place called the Tudor Hotel, and eventually, it's a whole story. It was an A LF adult congregate living facility, and we turned it into a three quarter way house.

That's where addicts and alcohols live after treatment. And eventually I lied to him. I told him I had this Freemans doctor that wanted to open up a treatment center, and he said, if you have it, I'll give you the money. So he asked me how much money? What do I know? I was in a treatment center. I know nothing about how much. So I said, oh, a quarter of a million dollars. So that's what I did. And I went to this doctor, I told him, and he says, oh, I was just thinking about that. He was always a comedian. And he says, okay. And we opened up a treatment center. Well, I went back to school. I got my GED. I went to college. I got my 300 hours, then I had hours. But the people I went in partnership with was my therapist and my doctor, and my therapist was jealous that I was his client and I was his boss.

So eventually he took the treatment center out from under me, and the doctor had a sex addiction problem, and he was spending all the money on the women, and we couldn't make payroll. It was the whole thing. So that traumatized me. Also, he, because I'm a street kid, you cheat me, I beat you up. But now I'm in recovery. I didn't know what to do. My first inclination was to call my uncle to have him kill him, and then I'm in recovery. I decided that's not very spiritual. So I got rid of that. Then I eventually wind up working there. I got my 6,000 hours, but during that time, it was a lot of trials and tribulations with this guy, and they gave me $80,000. They gave me my contract after I threatened to beat him up. Then I opened up another center. I didn't know.

I opened it up with a corporate Raider, and I built it up after a year, and he took it out from under me. It was the same thing, mistake I made the first time. I made the second time, I didn't have a lawyer. So when you don't have a lawyer, you can't be your own lawyer, just like you can't be your own doctor. Excuse me. So here I am again with no treatment center crying, sitting on the hood of my car, the parking lot with my little box of valuables that I had, and I got this treatment center taken away from me. And then I worked in a non-for-profit place that was a 55 bed facility for people with HIV and people that had dual diagnosed had mental health issues and substance abuse, and they were an old TC program, therapeutic community, and they used to put people in the middle of the room, beat 'em up, and then try to build them up.

Well, I know one thing, I didn't need anybody to beat me up or did a good enough job on my own, so that didn't work for me. And the food, they were giving them sugars and cakes and causing them to act out after the sugar. Like kids try to give your kids sugar before they go to sleep at night. Let me know how you do. No, no, it's okay. No, that's alright. So anyway, then I was going out with this woman and she talked me into opening up a treatment center. I had no money. I had a spending addiction because most addicts have more than one addiction. And anyway, I had $300. My friend owned the property and I said, okay, how much do you want for the property? 750 square feet. He says, how much money you guys, I got $300 in the bank. So he says, all right, give me the $300 and a couple of months after you get some money in. So that's what I did, and God really blessed me with a lot of things.

I met a lot of good people and everybody used to laugh at me because I was giving people vitamins, teaching 'em about meditation and exercise and all this stuff. And everybody go to your diet. I'll give you a vitamin, it'll cure you. But that's not what I was saying. It's saying you need a comprehensive approach to the sickness that we have. It's more than just Mommy left you in three and you have trauma. Yeah, that's part of it. But there's a whole other system below your head, which is called your body. So eventually we were broke as a joke, and we had the creditors chasing us for years, and nobody wanted to answer the phone. No, you answered the phone. No, you answered the phone. None of us wanted to answer the phone because of the creditors. But eventually we weathered those storms and we brought in my partner's son who knew about the internet, and our treatment center took off, and I'm going to cut right to the chase after a while. Now, at the beginning I had one client, I mean one therapist. That was me. Then we had two at the end, which is when we sold in 2012. We had that treatment center in 19 96, 19 5.

We had 147 employees and seven buildings, and we wind up selling the treatment center. The only reason we saw was my partner got sick. He had cancer for, he had a stroke for about four and a half years, and his son didn't want to work there anymore. And it was very stressful. I was running the business, all of the facilities and everything, and it was really too much. So I said, okay, and we wind up selling it for, and there's a whole story on this came about too, for 45 million. If you would've told me that years ago, I probably would've punched you in the face thinking you're making fun of me.

So anyway, that's what happened. We winded up selling it. The guy went out of business in three years after all that because he cut everybody in half. He says, you shouldn't have that many employees. You can do this with less employees. You can cut salaries, you can do this. And he just gutted the program. We had a tremendous reputation. He destroyed it, unfortunately for greed. And yes, we did have more people than we needed, but that was okay. So we took less money in our pocket, but we gave better treatment and we had a tremendous results with our treatment center. We did research. We did hyperbaric chamber oxygen under pressure to help heal the brain. We did acupuncture, we did biofeedback, neurofeedback, gut testing, nutrient testing, all these co factors into depression and anxiety. We also did light and sound therapy. We did lymphatic massage to get the drugs out on a cellular level.

We did colonics to clear out the lower intestines. We took them to the gym, we took them to karate. We did so many different things with them teaching them life skills and how to have a life and spirituality. We had a group just based on spirituality, non-denominational, to teach them about how to have a foundation have a higher power other than yourself. And it worked out real good, but we decided to make it a different way. So what I decided to do since I almost died from this disease, my son almost died. Those of you have children. If you ever had to watch your son laying in a hospital bed, ODing and then putting charcoal down his throat, it's not a good feeling, especially if you're a recovering addict and you're blaming yourself like I did. But even though I know it wasn't my fault for that choices that he made, because after I got clean, I said a good example, but it wasn't good enough.

But anyway, he's clean today, 18, 19 years, he's got values, he's got everything. But I was blessed. But that doesn't happen with everybody. Unfortunately, A lot of kids are dying. So the families, unfortunately, are sicker than the client. And I know people get insulted by that, but sorry, that's what I'm finding out. They're enablers and some of them are doing drugs, and some of them are non-existing parents shaming and guilting and that kind of thing. And they don't have good parenting skills. And believe it or not, that rubs off along with the people in the street that they get information from. So I opened up this treatment center and I changed the way treatment's done, and I'm still doing my best to do that. What people don't understand, depression and anxiety don't just come from psychological. That's a piece of it, but it also comes from your gut, which you can have leaky gut syndrome.

Look it up guys. I don't want you to believe anything I tell you. You have leaky gut syndrome, h pylori, infection, low testosterone, high testosterone can cause depression and anxiety, hypoglycemia, low blood sugar, close head injuries can cause depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation and behavioral problems. So there's a host of things that we have medically that can cause depression and anxiety. We're not looking at all this as a group of clinicians. We're only looking at one piece of the pie, and it's not working very well because it's a five to 8% recovery rate. Now, psychedelics is now coming into the field and there's people that go, oh, that's no good. Well, special K was ketamine and psychedelics. We used to party with that. And yeah, you're right. I used to party with that too. But you see what you learn about when you do plant medicine psychedelics, it's your intent. Now, if you have a therapist and you have a proper intent and you go into this journey, and what that journey's about is it takes you into your psyche, it goes right into your subconscious, and that's what I call the hard drive of the brain. Now, talk therapy deals with the software of the brain, but everything as we know, it's just like a computer. If you erase your stuff, alright, off your computer, it's on your hard drive. That's why the FBI comes in and checks your hard drive.

So all that stuff that's driving all these behaviors and all those feelings comes from your hard drive. But then you need guidance. You need psychedelics. Just doing that without therapy, integration and support, go to self-help groups. Doing the work is worthless in my opinion. I'll say why. Okay, now some people may get a lot of help from it anyway, but those are very small numbers. I'm looking at creating more numbers and more impact. And the bottom line, it needs to have therapy along with it and the proper atmosphere and the proper intent and the proper follow-up care. Otherwise, it's like anything you have to, if you go to the gym and exercise and think you're going to lose weight, you're making a mistake. First of all, it's 90% diet, 10% exercise. So people don't understand that. So there's a lot of information out there how things can actually change your life, but people don't know about it.

And that's why I do these podcasts. That's why I'm out there. And I always tell people, don't believe me. I can't believe this. I'm in, here's a kid from the South Bronx, went to the ninth grade, eventually got a GED, do all that stuff. And here I am. I'm an author. I lectured to almost a hundred countries. I go all over the world. I've been in every television show, C-N-N-N-B-C, everywhere. I have my own podcast. I do these podcasts with people like yourself, Michelle, who wants to get health and wellness, health to the population. And look, the best time in the world is helping God's kids, another human being. I don't care what you do. Money is not the only thing of life. You can make money and lose money, but if you lose your reputation, you really lost something and your view of the world that is positive because otherwise you're just a drone walking around, gathering toys. So anything else you would like to know, Michelle?


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah. So if somebody is going through and they want help, they're trying to seek help or a family member wants somebody to have help, how do you know which therapy is going to be best for you or a loved one?


John Giordano :

Well, there are certain therapies that are better than others. It's like certain foods are better than other foods. Okay. Personally, NLP Neurolinguistic program, you have cognitive behavioral therapy, you have gestalt therapy, you have what I call TRTI, redeveloped, EMDR, which is eye movement desensitization reprocessing. That's for trauma that they use. I use that as a foundation. And then I am also a hypnotherapist and I also do breath work. So I do a lot of different modalities. I included into this technology that I developed and I work with our military people coming back from Iraq, Afghanistan. I work with women and men who've been molested, traumatized, raped. I work with police officers that have been in shootings. I'm also a chaplain for the police department. So I love learning and keeping an open mind. And as far as which it's not about the therapy so much, it's about the therapist that you get a rapport when rapport is 99.9% of everything.

If you don't connect with somebody, no matter what you're telling you, good or bad, it's not going to stick. And what people don't understand is that you have to put effort in. Nobody's going to fix you. Therapists don't fix you. I don't fix anybody. They fix themselves. All I'm doing is saying, here's a menu. You're in a restaurant. What food would you like? Okay, I'm not cooking it, I'm just showing you what's on the menu. And that's basically what therapists need to do. But unfortunately, some therapists want to hold on to clients because of cost. There's money, and I understand that dynamic. But if you really want to help people, try to get 'em out as quick as you can, let 'em rely on themselves. The old saying with Jesus, they said instead of him giving fish, he taught him how to fish. And that's the whole thing. So that's what life's really about. It's about finding a God of your understanding and never giving up. And remember, there are no failures in life. There are only lessons. It's how you knew those lessons and those fish and how you apply that. I want to read, I'll segue right into this thing that I want to read. It's on the back of this book,


Michelle Henderson :

And I'm going to put that on the screen so people can see it while you read it and it's on the back cover. Okay?


John Giordano :

This is the book, the Kid from the South Bronx who never gave up. Here is my roadmap for positive change. There is one thing in this world, one special lesson, one constant that has guided me through the turbulent waters of life. This infinite rule, which most people know but ignore or who simply do not follow their life lessons. That is no matter what, no matter the circumstances, the obstacles, the people that get in our way or things that slow us down, follow this one simple rule. Never give up on your dreams, never let go of your passions, and especially never give up on yourself or God of your understanding. My name is John Giordano and I'm a recovering addict who turned $300 into 45 million. I was blessed to become extremely successful, and I'd like to share my story with you. This is how my life was transformed and how I was saved from falling into the abyss of hell and by following this one rule and learning how to have a life worth living.


Michelle Henderson :

Wow. Thank you so much for sharing that and also sharing your information through your books and also your talks. But his other books is How to Be Your Addictions and Live a Quality Life. And then also he contributed in the book Molecule Neuro Biology of Addiction Recovery, the 12 Step Program and Fellowship.


John Giordano :

Well, let me explain how to Beat Your Addiction. The way I wrote that book is I interviewed around 200 addicts, alcoholics, eating disorder, people, gamblers that were in what I consider in recovery, not just stopping the behaviors, but actually having a life worth living. And I wanted to know what they did and what they didn't do. And then I interviewed about a hundred, 150 chronic relapsers and all kinds of different addictions, and I wanted to know what they did and what they didn't do, and I want to put that in the book. Then I put my own stuff in there and some of the research in the back and some of the mental health issues that go along with addiction, and that's how I wrote the book, how to Beat Your Addiction. Now, the other book is how 12 step programs, Self-Help Groups Church and how it works with your neurobiology, raising a dopamine and serotonin levels by being around like-minded people that are in a positive way of looking at life instead of a negative. Because that negative energy we absorb just like we absorb positive energy. So if you hang out in the barber shop long enough, you're going to get a haircut. So the bottom line is this. Look around who you're hanging out with. If that negative people, I suggest that if you can't help 'em, leave them.


Michelle Henderson :

Right. I love it. I love it. Now you got to tell us about your new podcast.


John Giordano :

I wanted to get into the psychedelic podcast because one of the leading experts in psychedelic medicine, and the reason why I wanted to do that, I just want people that love psychedelics to come on. I want people that don't like them, don't know about 'em, don't understand and don't believe in them because all I can do is share information. I don't push anything on anybody because that doesn't work very well. I know if you're pushing something on me, I'm going the other way. But there's a lot of science behind this stuff where we do pet scans, CAT scans in the brain watching how it grows, new connections. But those new connections have to be developed. You have to support them with therapy, proper food, proper without eating sugars and processed foods and exercise and spirituality and meditation and prayer. All of this makes us up as a human being. We're not just one little piece a spec. We're integrated. We're a system like the planet. So what we want to do is we want to address every part of that system where there is a deficiency and strengthen that and strengthen the parts there. So that's the approach. Psychedelics has been around for thousands of years. Every religion use psychedelics. Most people don't know that.


Michelle Henderson :

Okay? Oh, absolutely. Do the research. That's what you'll be talking about.


John Giordano :

Then you need the intent. Your intent makes everything the difference. If people in recovery, they don't want to do opiates. Oh, I can't do opiates. I'm an opiate addict. Yeah, you're right. But now you're in the hospital, you got a major operation I had just eight weeks ago, and that's a lot of pain. So I took opiates for about three days and I stopped. I still had pain, but I could tolerate that pain. But now my intention was to say, oh, I need a little bit more. Oh, I need this. I need that. Now. You relapsed in here. Next is out here. Okay, so intention is very important, and that's everything. What's your intent when you fall in love is because you got money and I want to get your money or because they really care about you.


Michelle Henderson :

Love it. That's it. I absolutely love it. And I think the podcast is going to be a success because I think there's so many people that are learning about it that did not grow up in the sixties, and if they did, they need to look at it from a different point of view than it was in the sixties.


John Giordano :

For the psychedelic, well might be also about language. It's them a neurolinguistic programming guide. LLP is, it's the guys that ler, and I can't remember the other guy's name. Bandler are the ones that have invented, one was a psychologist and one was a linguist. Language is very interesting, like you said, well, I think it's going to be a success. I want you to try something out. Michelle say, I think your name is Michelle.


Michelle Henderson :

I'm sorry, say that again.


John Giordano :

Okay. You said, I think your podcast is going to be success, so that means you're telling me you don't know. Yeah, it's true. You don't know. Okay. But as the person that's doing that podcast, if I say I think it's going to be a success, that means I'm not sure and I'm not bought into what I'm doing. So I say, I know it's going to be a success. So see, language tells your brain how to simulate everything and how to project out what you're doing. I think I could pick up this weight, or I'm going to try to be at your podcast next week. Well, what do you mean you're going to try? You're going to be there. You're not going to be there. Right, right. So it's very important that we get very cognizant. We have to take custody of our thoughts, our eyes, our speech, and that's what we're responsible for. So you have to be very cognizant of how we speak to ourselves and other people. I think I can help you, Michelle. I'm telling you, I'm not sure.


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah, no, I get it after you said that. That is so true. And I think we tend to short change ourselves because we do that all the time. We defeat ourselves before we even get started, but


John Giordano :

It's unconscious. It's what our environment has taught us to say, oh, I'm going to try to do this. And you hear it all the time.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, you do. I agree. Yeah. Well, okay, let me ask you this. Are you ready for the last question?


John Giordano :

Go for it.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, good. I thought you were going to say, well, I think I am. Yes, I know you're ready, John. I know you're ready. Okay, let's go and spin it and see what the last question the episode's going to be. Let's learn more. Oh my goodness. Okay. I love this for you because in your book you talk a lot about trauma in your childhood and a lot of things that did keep you going, but what is your favorite childhood memory?


John Giordano :

When my father used to bring home hot dogs and these onions that you used to get from the hot dog stand, and then he used to get you bed syrup and seltzer. There's the seltzer bottles. Oh yes, chocolate egg creams, cream. That's my favorite childhood thought.


Michelle Henderson :

Isn't that interesting? It just the little things that, now, did your dad know about that? Did you tell your dad him how important it meant to you?


John Giordano :

Unfortunately not. And unfortunately, my dad never seen me clean and sober, and all he saw was the addict. So those who don't, I'm coming. Wow. I just turned 39 years in recovery from drugs, alcohol, all that stuff.


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah. Oh, that is awesome. Alright, so where can they reach you? What's your favorite form of

communication? If they want to talk to you,


John Giordano :

They can go to John, the letter J Giordano, G-I-O-R-D-A-N-O. It's on your screen.com. Or they could call me on my cell (786) 271-5732. If they're interested in treatment, where to go, who to do call me and people go, how could you give out your cell number? Well, I just did it. It's 7 8 6 2 7 1 5 7 3 2. I said, that's not that hard.


Michelle Henderson :

No, and you know what? That just shows how much of a big heart you have because you know that people, if they need help, they need a number. Right. Then when they hear it and not later.


John Giordano :

That's right.


Michelle Henderson :

Or look it up. So they need it.


John Giordano :

Bottom line is this, if they're calling me, they're in trouble. Most people don't want to reach out when they feel sick or bad or depressed. So if God sent them to me, whatever God is to anybody else, then it's my job to see what I can do for them to help them without enabling them or being codependent with them. Right.


Michelle Henderson :

So to end the episode, what I want you to think of is one word to leave people with.


John Giordano :

Can I do two words?


Michelle Henderson :

Sure.


John Giordano :

Okay. Never give up.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, I love that. Never give up. You heard it here. And if you know somebody, that's okay. If you know somebody that needs to hear this episode, please share it with them, because there's so many people out there that just don't know where to go, and they feel alone, and they need to know that there is hope. I will see. See.


John Giordano :

And then they can filter on Amazon


Michelle Henderson :

And what?


John Giordano :

On Amazon. They can get the books


Michelle Henderson :

And you can get three of his books on Amazon. All right. We'll see you next week.


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