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  • Writer's pictureMichelle Henderson

The Dice of Love: Paul Zolman's Tool for Daily Kindness


Paul Zolman
The Dice of Love

In a heartwarming and insightful conversation, Michelle Henderson recently sat down with Paul Zolman, a man dedicated to transforming lives through the power of love. Their discussion delved into Paul's personal journey of overcoming generational anger and his mission to spread love and kindness.

 

The Journey to Love

 

Paul Zolman began by reflecting on his upbringing in a family where anger and criticism were prevalent. This generational practice of stacking annoyances led to a culture of anger, something Paul was determined to change. "Talking about love really is a positive thing, a happy thing, and I wanted to be a happier person," he shared.

 

Transformation Process

 

Changing from a negative to a loving person wasn't an overnight transformation. Paul emphasized the importance of self-actualization and gradual improvement. He recognized his critical nature, especially towards his children, and decided to shift his focus from criticism to understanding and nurturing.

 

Paul highlighted the significance of small, daily efforts in this transformation. "If all our faults were dumped on us in the dump truck on our front yard and we had to deal with it all that day, we'd be so overwhelmed," he explained. Instead, he tackled one issue at a time, progressively moving towards a more loving and positive outlook.

 

The Role of Love

 

The conversation then turned to the impact of love on personal relationships and family dynamics. Paul shared how his children's reactions to his negative behavior prompted him to change. By identifying and focusing on positive attributes, he was able to foster a more loving environment.

 

Forgiveness and Gratitude

 

Forgiveness played a crucial role in Paul's journey. He had to forgive himself and his parents to break free from the cycle of anger. He advised others to focus on the positive aspects of their relationships and practice gratitude. "Start looking for the gratitude as a great way to start forgiveness," Paul recommended.

 

The Dice of Love

 

One of the unique tools Paul developed in his journey is the "Dice of Love." Inspired by Dr. Gary Chapman's five love languages, Paul created a dice with different love actions on each side. Rolling the dice daily determines the love language to practice that day, encouraging consistent acts of kindness.

 

Implementing Love in Schools

 

Paul has also introduced his love dice concept in schools, where teachers use it to promote kindness and empathy among students. The dice helps students focus on positive behaviors, reducing bullying and fostering a supportive classroom environment. "Journal writing actually is a decompression activity," Paul noted, highlighting the benefits of daily reflection on love and kindness.

 

Corporate Sponsorship

 

To further his mission, Paul collaborates with corporate sponsors to incentivize students' participation in the love dice activity. Sponsors provide rewards for students who consistently practice and document their acts of kindness, reinforcing positive behaviors.

 

Final Thoughts

 

Paul's dedication to spreading love and kindness is truly inspiring. He believes that focusing on the positive aspects of others and practicing daily acts of love can transform lives and communities. As he eloquently put it, "What you send out is going to come back to you."

 

A Challenge for You

 

To wrap up the conversation, Michelle and Paul encouraged listeners to take on a weekly challenge. Roll the dice and practice the love language it lands on every day for a week. This week, the dice landed on "spend time." Whether it's quality time with loved ones or taking some time for yourself, embrace the power of time and make meaningful connections.

 

By focusing on love and kindness, we can create a more positive and compassionate world. Thank you, Paul Zolman, for sharing your journey and inspiring us all to live with love.



Transcript of Episode:


Michelle Henderson :

Paul, thank you so much for coming today to have this conversation. How are you doing today?


Paul Zolman:

I'm doing well, Michelle. Thank you for inviting me to be here. It's such a pleasure to be with you, and I'm looking forward to our conversation.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, absolutely. And Paul, I love what you put the role of love now. How can you have an awful conversation when you're talking about love you, it's not possible.


Paul Zolman:

That's right. That's right. I love that you said that, Michelle, because it really was, that was really kind of the impetus for me to change my life and I was looking for something for myself to change myself because I had this generational practice. My father had it, my brothers had it. It must've been passed down through the generations that we stack annoyance on top of annoyance, on top of annoyance being critical of other people. And it's always being annoyed at what other people are doing, thinking they're doing it wrong, that we can do better, elevating ourselves. It's kind of an angry attribute of an angry culture, and I wanted to get rid of that. I said, enough's enough. This generational thing has to stop. And so talking about love really is a positive thing, a happy thing, and I wanted to be a happier person. So here we are.


Michelle Henderson :

And it's quite interesting because the way that you talk about it, it seems like it was easy for you to get where you are today, and I know that whenever you grow up in a family beliefs and the behaviors of negativity and everything I did, you wake up one day and just say, I'm going to change myself. Or what was your process of actually changing from being that angry person, that negative person, into such a loving person?


Paul Zolman:

Good question, Michelle. And I think that there's really got to be that stuff, actualization of little things along the way. If all our faults were dumped on us in the dump truck on our front yard and we had to deal with it all that day, we'd be so overwhelmed. And so thankfully, little by little we get these little dumps, these little things that we have to work on every single day. And as we work on those things, then you get to the edge of the light and then you look into the darkness that, oh, I see some other things that I need to start working on. It's just little by little that way. So one of the things for me was that I realized that I'm critical. I was critical and I was putting down my children. I would talk to my children about something they did for maybe the very first time and thinking what a terrible thing that they did that just didn't do it right. It was their first time. I didn't give 'em that latitude, that indeed it was their first time. But I was thinking my own experience, trying to overlay that onto them, realize there's a problem there. And so I need to recognize the feelings of other people and recognize where they're at in their journey. Quit thinking that their journey's, my journey to quit thinking that I had control over what their choices were and start just making my own choices and helping them make better choices on their own.


Michelle Henderson :

You know what, I absolutely love that because what I was hearing was it was the father loving you. You know what I'm saying? You saw the reaction probably of how your kids were reacting after you put something down negativity. And to me, that's nurturing side of you just came out and thought, I need to change. And so to me, that is such a role model for your children.


Paul Zolman:

Thank you, Michelle. That's very nice of you. But I think maybe the opposite way around though too, that my children were sent to me so that they could teach me by their reactions, and then by that I was able to say, oh, I've got to improve that. Just quite a bit, a little bit. I found what was most helpful, Michelle, throughout my life and through this process, is that if I could identify with an adjective, what is my behavior right now, and then think, well, what's the opposite of that? And then try to understand where was that behavior that I was doing on the spectrum of the angry culture that I grew up in versus the loving culture that I wanted to be in. Where was it on that particular spectrum? Take for example, sarcasm, sarcasms on the angry side of the stick. It's on that angry in that angry culture. If you consider what the opposite might be, it might be a word like genuine or authentic or somebody that was true blue. When you put all those words together and put it all out on the table, I think most people are going to gravitate that they want to be authentic, that they want to be genuine, and that they want to do those things. They'll move away from that sarcasm.


Michelle Henderson :

You know what? I had never thought about sarcasm. And I'll tell you a little story real quick, because my dad, he did have some anger issues and he was very sarcastic, but I didn't even think about that because I thought that whenever he was being sarcastic that he was trying to release some things. I guess he was in a negative way, but I thought it was just his way of breaking the ice. But I really like how you said that because the intent behind the sarcasm is so different.


Paul Zolman:

It is. And some people use sarcasm for humor to inject humor into a situation. And it's funny as can be, but if you stay in that sarcastic mode and all things are sarcastic to you, then you have some underlying issues that really, let's see the genuine side of you from time to time. We need to see that genuine side. And as you pursue that genuine side, it just becomes less tasteful and more distasteful to actually act in the act of sarcasm. And you become want to be genuine all the time. You want your words to match your actions so that you almost feel like you're, you unified within. You've got that essence within that is really a powerful essence, that there's some harmony there, there's some synergy there. There's some alignment there with reality that that's how you want to portray yourself. That's how you want to be remembered. And love is all about how do you want to be remembered? What legacy will you leave? And I did not want to leave that angry legacy to my children,


Michelle Henderson :

And I love that. Now, how many children do you have?


Paul Zolman:

Only eight.


Michelle Henderson :

I've read that. I went, he has eight children and he is still in the loving light. I think that's wonderful,


Paul Zolman:

Michelle. You have to put it in perspective. So my grandfather had 19 children and my father, I'm number 10 of 11 children, so I'm scaling it down. Eight is less, less than what the generation, and my kids are only having three. I don't get this, Michelle. I want more grandchildren. You have children to have grandchildren, right? Isn't that the rule?


Michelle Henderson :

That is the rule.


Paul Zolman:

I want more, but again, I don't have control over that, but it's just a desire there.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh no, I can understand being a grandmother for the first time. I would love tons of 'em now. So I've got to ask you, and I always, because I find it very interesting because it is such a difficult topic to talk about, is forgiveness. Okay? So during the process of changing and morphing to who you are now, did you have to forgive yourself, not only yourself, but also your parents?


Paul Zolman:

Great question, Michelle. And let me answer it a couple of different ways because the forgiveness to me is very similar to what I was doing in that stacking annoyance on top of annoyance until had that flash of anger. Instead though, to get to forgiveness, you have to step kindness on top of kindness, on top of kindness, and then you get to that higher law of love. So as I discovered the five Languages of love from Dr. Gary Chapman, I realized that these are basics. These are those stacking of the kindnesses. This is foundational. This really is where love literacy should be across the world. Everybody should know these basics because stacking these basics will get you to that forgiveness, that higher law of love or compassion or mercy or intimacy or charity or sympathy or trust or empathy. Any of those are higher laws of love. We've got to be able to practice those basics to get there.

Could you imagine someone insulting, insulting, insulting, insulting. Then asking for forgiveness that doesn't reconcile won't work. So as far as forgiveness for me, it amounted to stop being the victim. Stop blaming your father for all these awkward moments, that traditional stacking of annoyances and that flashes of anger stopped blaming him for all that. When I stopped blaming him for that, I was 35 years old and I realized, oh, I'm responsible for my own actions. He had been dead already seven years, Michelle. And it came to the realization that how can I blame him? I can't even talk to him about it. Why? I better stop blaming him, start forgiving him. There are a few things that when that moment happened there, I started to think, well, what did I even like about my father? Just because I had all this blame and all this anger toward him.

What was it that I liked about my father? And there were a couple of things that came up. I remember I had a hernia operation at five years old, and I remember him carrying me out. He didn't make me walk, but he carried me out of the hospital. And that was such a tender moment for me. I do remember that. And then the other thing is that he dated my mother every single Friday night. I don't know that he ever missed, I can't remember. I can't even keep up with that. Michelle and I have eight children and we have a lot of dates, but I could not even keep up with that. So start looking for the gratitude is a great way to start forgiveness. And then you just need to stop being the victim.


Michelle Henderson :

I absolutely love that, and I agree with you there is that we really need to look at the positive aspects of what they brought to your life so that you can change that negativity into a positive thing. Because I think too, if we hold on to that negative thing about what our parents did, like you said, you're still the victim and you're not moving on with your life, but if you find that gratitude of what they did for you, it kind of changes it into love. So let's talk about the book and about your die as well. Absolutely love it. And I know that what was the inspiration first of all, of deciding, you know what, I need to write a book and I need to do invent this procedure of rolling a dye.


Paul Zolman:

Good question, Michelle. And actually I had the dye. The dye is just about one inch by one inch right now, but it started out this big. I mean, it was two and a half inches by two and a half inches. I just laser engraved Dr. Chapman's things on it for my own personal use. And it had really the sharp, you can see how sharp the edges are on that. And so it was really kind of clunky in the very beginning. And I would look at what's on top, look at what's on the side, and I say, well, I think I want that today. And then knowing that it's going to go clunk, clunk, just because it wasn't rolling very well, I'd get what I want. And it was like a weighted diet. It really didn't have the random, the surprise on it that I was expecting, but just more clunk, clunk.

So I realized I have to just bevel off those edges, kind of smooth those edges off. Then it rolled a lot better. Took two years to develop the artwork for this dye. Created my own artwork. I asked Dr. Chapman if he would license the icons that he had for the love languages. And his attorney wrote back after a couple of weeks and said, no, we're not doing that. So I found an attorney in my neighborhood that was a friend and he was a copyright attorney, intellectual property attorney, and he told me this. He said, theory like the love language theory is not copyrightable application is. So they weren't doing it as a game. And I thought, well, I think a game would be really nice. So I decided to create my own icons and then put 'em on the dice. So this is what I came up with.

Dice has all pictures on it. You'll notice each has a hand on it as well. Hand is as if we're giving it away, which is the whole idea that we're giving this away all day, that day, all day. This one has an hourglass on the hand. So the hourglass measures time. This would be the love language of time, spending time, quality time with people. The next one looks like a waiter, waiters holding a platter that would represent service. The next one is Taylor Swift's Little Heart that she throws out to everybody. I had this copyright in 2017, so I don't know how long she's been doing it, but I've had at least that long. This one is a little bit different though. Michelle has a little conversation, fly out. Those would be the words of the heart. So those would represent the words. On the next side, it has two hands touching one another that would represent touch.

And then the last one has a handholding, a gift. So five love languages, six sides on the cube. The last one is Surprise me. Surprise me. It means that you're just watching for opportunities to do random acts of kindness or you could do any of the love languages if you see a need. Just do the D two instructions, your old cube every day, whatever it lands on, that's the love language you practice giving away all day that day, all day to everybody. Michelle, at the time I created it while I was single. I didn't have a significant other. I said, Dr. Chapman in the hell. Who in the heck I meant, who am I supposed to love? And sorry about that. Oh no. And I thought, well, I just have to love everybody. And so this was perfect for me. I don't know anybody, Michelle, that's with their significant other 24 7.

Some people don't want to be, but just, I didn't need a part-time job. I needed some, the replacement behavior for that stacking of the annoyances. I need a replacement behavior of that cyclic behavior for something else. And so this was perfect. Instead of focusing on what's wrong with people and being critical about what's wrong with them, looking at maybe 10 to 20% of a person that might be wrong, they might have false 10 to 20% of their character or personality. I was missing the 80 to 90% of that person. That was really good. And as I started to focus on what's really good about that person, I was so busy, Michelle, I didn't have time to be annoyed. I didn't have time to get angry. I didn't have time for any criticism at all. I was focusing on what's right about that person, what is there to love that is unique about that person? And it just changed my life overnight. It really, from that point on, it was a very quick process. It was like I was facing this way one day and next day I'm facing about face. It was totally just 180 degree change in what I'm looking for in a different person.


Michelle Henderson :

Excuse me. My goodness. So you made it into a habit, which is a wonderful thing because after so many days now, were there days that you're gloomy and you're going, you know what? I don't think I want to do it today. But if you did, did you see a change in your attitude once you rolled the dice and took action?


Paul Zolman:

It's a good question. I don't think anyone's ever asked me that question, Michelle. But for this, I had been wanting something different in my life for a long time. So that first 30 days, I really didn't have any days like that, that I wanted to stop doing it or didn't want to do it or just thought it was a chore. This actually is something that I really wanted in my life. I wanted love in my life, and I realized that this is follows, the law of the harvest follows. Karma follows the law of attraction. That whatever you send out, and this is the law, whatever you send out is going to eventually come back to you. But that wasn't the purpose. The purpose of sending it out, sending love out every single day was without expectation. It wasn't looking for that immediate return, wasn't looking.

If you send an anchor out, you get immediate return on that investment, so to speak. It'll come right back to you and it'll come back with the ferocity maybe 10 times worse or more worse than what you send it out. Who wants that? Who would choose that? Why would you choose that? And so I realized that I don't want to do that. So I want to focus on the love. So I really wanted to do this every single day. There really wasn't any lapse that way, but I could understand if people have that lapse and they feel down, I have a remedy for that. That has worked for me throughout my life that whenever I felt down, all I have to do is walk out my door, walk out into the neighborhood. There is pain under every roof, everywhere in the world, anywhere in the world you're looking, there is pain under that roof. And because of that, I can find someone that's a little bit more down than I am, try to lift them up. As you lift them up, then there's great satisfaction. You feel lifted up as well. And it's almost a byproduct. It's not exactly what you're looking for, but it's a byproduct of helping some other people. That's what how you get self-love, so to speak. That's how you feel that great satisfaction that you're doing something good for someone else and it lifted you at the same time.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, absolutely. Love that. And that's one thing I love about your book, because the role of Love your book, it talks about different ways and strategies that you can use the Dai for. And the one thing that I loved is I was a school teacher. And you say that there was a teacher who used it for their class. And I'm going, oh my gosh, what a wonderful concept is so well needed right now.


Paul Zolman:

Absolutely. And so in the classroom, what happens, Michelle, and I'm testing it actually in K through six right now, the primary grades, and I love what they're doing. It takes two seconds to roll the dye, maybe 30 to 45 seconds for the teacher to say, class, this is what we're doing today. This is what you want to watch for today. So at the end of the day, what happens is the teacher says, now it's time to record what you rolled, what opportunities you saw to love in that way. What you did about those opportunities becomes a love journal for that first grader or that third grader or the fifth grader. And so the teacher at the end of the day will do just a check mark, say, yep, Johnny did it, Mary did it. And then maybe read a few of the stories. If that teacher finds an outstanding story, one or two, I would read that the next day and say, look what Johnny did yesterday for the love language.

And just encourage the other students to write something, watch for those opportunities and write something about the opportunities that they got. What that does is it just that student now is responsible age six. They're responsible for their own behavior. I had to wait till age 35 before I realize I got to stop blaming other people for my problems. And so this is huge relief for the teacher, huge relief for the principal. Oh, now the students get to be responsible for their own stuff. It's going to tamp down a lot of the bullying, a lot of the violence that might be going on in the classroom because they knew. They know now they have to report at the end of the day, they have to write it. And with that writing, the teacher puts the check mark, student takes it home. The astute parents will stack those in chronological order.

And at the end of that school year, bind it up in some way. Now you've got a first grade journal or a third grade journal or fifth grade journal. Now you've got a journal for that child. Michelle. I remember my first grade teacher, I remember her name to this day. I remember it was such a different situation in the classroom from what I had at home. I must have felt the love. I wish I would've had a journal about that. What was it about that classroom that was so different? What was it about Mrs. Rogers that just made me want to go to school, want to be in that class? I don't remember, second, third, fourth or fifth grade. I do remember sixth grade. So there were teachers that had specific influence on me in some particular way that I want that recording. I want that journal from that. I would love to have a journal like that from my own parents or my grandparents. Instead, Michelle, I got a journal about the weather, the weather 60 years ago. Who cares what the weather was like 60 years ago? I would've loved to have a love journal. What was there to love in their day and what did they do about it?


Michelle Henderson :

And I love that because you can also find out when you are reading a journal, not only can the child read where they were and how they changed, plus everybody else who reads it. But to me it's more that they find out more about themselves as well. I absolutely journaling. Oh my


Paul Zolman:

Gosh. Oh good. Yeah. You know what it is for that teacher too, is that student. And I've talked with teachers around the world, Michelle, that student by the last 10 to 15 minutes of the day is not going to be any productive at all. They're tired. They've been there all day. They're antsy. They know the bell's going to ring. They can't. Their mind is mush. They can't learn one more thing and you can't push one more thing. So journal writing actually is a decompression activity that they'll ah, now they're ready for whatever comes after school. Now they've got a different mindset. They've just let go through journal writing. They've let go of what happened in the day, all the good that was there that day. And hopefully they're watching for good and they're doing good, and they're forgiving others that are struggling with it.


Michelle Henderson :

Well, you understand that the school day, I mean, I'm listening to you, I'm thinking, yep, yep, yep. That's what I went through as a teacher. You're right. And then I remember one year I taught math at the end of the day. Now why would I do that for a youngster? And it was just the schedule that they gave me. Now, middle school's different, but the young ones cannot. Well, middle school sometimes, I don't want to say that too. They're older. But I absolutely love that too. And I remember the students who had a difficult home life, and when they would bring it out in the classroom, I knew it. And those are the ones that I remember the most through the years at seeing how they changed. And then they started trusting in me. Because trust is a big thing. Whenever you have a child that's going through a lot of difficult times. So I absolutely love that, that you're integrating it into the school day because it is so well needed right now because our kids are so lost. And so Paul, thank you so much for offering your services.


Paul Zolman:

There's one other thing with that, Michelle, that I'm cooperating with. Some corporate sponsors, a local corporate sponsor that owns a yogurt land franchise. So if the children will record a journal entry, some children will choose and maybe choose not to do it. But if they do choose to do it and they do it for 15 days, he'll give them five ounces of yogurt for free if they'll do it for 25 days. In fact, make it a habit like we're talking about. If they'll make it that habit, he'll give them 10 ounces of yogurt for free for that particular month, that and then renews every single month. But I'm also Michelle looking for corporate sponsors that would do it in all the communities, wherever that corporate sponsor is, wherever there are school teachers, we will try to coordinate something, get something set up in cities across the nation, across the world. I'm interested to take it to that point right now.


Michelle Henderson :

And so I guess if a corporation goes, yes, I do, they would contact you at role of love

Paul Zolman:

Role love com. Correct.


Michelle Henderson :

Okay. Okay. So yeah. So pass the word. That's how My Love podcast is because you don't know who's listening and somebody may know somebody that knows somebody, and that's good enough. You know what I'm saying? To get, so is there anything that we did not want to talk about that you want to make sure that we get into this conversation?


Paul Zolman:

I just want to mention that what we focus on is what we're going to get. I love the analogy of the magnifying glass, that whatever you magnify is going to grow larger. Just remember that if we're focusing on the faults of another person, they're going to be larger. Those faults will become larger and crowd out the good of that person. We really don't want to get that kind of view of another person. Just view them as a human being. See them, who they are, where they're at, and just acknowledge their existence and their journey along their path in their life. And if we can come to that point of acknowledgement, we really don't need anything inclusive because everybody's a human being. Everybody needs that same grace. Everybody needs that same benefit of good thoughts being thought about them, rather than focusing on weaknesses of anybody.

We're focusing on the positive. The positive is going to come back to us. We're focusing on their negatives. Guess what? It's coming right back. They're going to look at your weaknesses. And do you really want that? No, people don't. Yeah, just think of it. Just be conscious of that, that what you send out is going to come back to you. And then one last thing that Michelle, that I like to leave the listeners, is that I love, love that we're talking about languages and the law of languages, but there's a language of a Sanskrit dialect in Northern India that we get wonderful words like nirvana or karma. But the one I want to talk about is namaste. Namaste is what the yoga teacher says at the end of the class. Azar head and says, Namaste. And everybody else says, Namaste. It doesn't mean, hey, all class is over. You can go now. It doesn't mean that. So the Hindu interpretation of that means the God in me sees the God in you, or put another way. The divine in me sees the divine in you. We really need to watch for those divine attributes that each one of us have. That's what makes us different. That's what really defines us. That's what helps us be a better person and focus on becoming who we really are, our essence.


Michelle Henderson :

I love it. And you don't even have to do yoga to do namaste. I mean, it doesn't just have to take place at yoga. It can take places anywhere. You know what I'm saying? When you want to bless somebody or what you're saying with that language, you can say that as well. Absolutely. Alright, Paul, are you ready for the last question?


Paul Zolman:

I'm ready for the last question.


Michelle Henderson :

All right, let's do it. Never know where it may


Paul Zolman:

Land. This is so much fun, Michelle. I loved this.


Michelle Henderson :

Well, good. I'm glad you do. It's the teacher in me that brings it out. All right. So if you had a superpower, which you absolutely do, okay, but if you have a superpower that you don't have now, what would it be?


Paul Zolman:

Oh, you've ruined it. When you said I don't have now, because I have a T-shirt, Michelle that says, it already says kindness is my superpower. There you go. If there was a superpower, I would want it to be gentleness or kindness or I see you. That would be my superpower. Just I can see who you are. That would be my favorite superpower.


Michelle Henderson :

That is perfect. Yeah, you don't have to change, even though I question it a certain way. You do answer however you feel like you want to answer. Thank you. Alright, you're welcome. So Paul, thank you so much for this wonderful conversation of love. You can't go wrong and being, yes, your superpower being very kind. But before we go, what I think would be a fantastic thing is go ahead and roll the dye and see what our listeners need to work on. I'm going to say for this week, so do it every day for this week.


Paul Zolman:

Spend time. Oh


Michelle Henderson :

Time. Oh, that is so important.


Paul Zolman:

Just take a little time. My wife loves time and she just loves me to sit beside her. We don't talk or anything because we're watching a Korean drama. That's how she likes to spend time. And you have to read the subtitles, so you really can't talk. You're reading the subtitles and that's how she likes to spend time. So it doesn't have to require talking at all. Just be there, be present with that person. Set your phone aside.


Michelle Henderson :

Absolutely. And I love it. And I love it. And it's so interesting. If I could show you my action board, it's not a vision board, it's my action board. It's the very first picture, spending time with my family. Nice. And so I love that. That is so important because we get so busy, everybody. So this week, what you're going to be working on is time, spending time and also think about, I don't know why I need to say this, but also spend time to yourself. Maybe you need to spend time by yourself or with somebody. Time can be so many different situations and you make it okay. Whatever you need in the moment. It doesn't have to be just spending with somebody. So just think about that. So I hope you enjoy this episode. Share with anybody that needs to know about this wonderful topic, and I will see y'all next week. Bye.

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