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  • Writer's pictureMichelle Henderson

Finding Light in Darkness: Amanda Blackwood's Story of Survival


Inspirational Journey
Surviving the Unimaginable

Finding Light in the Darkness:


In a world filled with stories of adversity and resilience, there are few tales as powerful and inspiring as that of Amanda Blackwood. A survivor of human trafficking, Amanda has transformed her journey into a beacon of hope and inspiration for others. From overcoming unimaginable challenges to finding strength in forgiveness, Amanda's story is one of triumph against all odds.

 

Growing up in a tumultuous environment marked by abuse and trauma, Amanda's early years were far from easy. However, she refused to let her past define her, and despite facing numerous obstacles, she embarked on a journey of self-discovery and healing.

 

Amanda candidly shares her story, acknowledging the pain and challenges she endured while also infusing her narrative with humor and resilience. She refers to her traumatic experiences as "trauma vomiting," emphasizing her refusal to let them consume her spirit. Instead, Amanda focuses on life post-trauma and the transformative power of forgiveness.

 

One of the misconceptions Amanda addresses is the stereotype surrounding human trafficking. She sheds light on the fact that trafficking can affect individuals of all ages and genders, debunking myths and highlighting the complex realities of this pervasive issue.

 

Throughout her journey, Amanda's resilience shines through. Despite facing multiple instances of trafficking and subsequent attempts to rebuild her life, she never lost sight of her inner strength. From escaping harrowing situations to navigating the challenges of starting over, Amanda's determination and courage are truly commendable.

 

A pivotal moment in Amanda's story is her realization that true strength comes from within. She rejects the notion that trauma defines one's worth and instead embraces the power of forgiveness as a means of breaking free from the chains of her past.

 

As an accomplished artist, author, and podcast host, Amanda channels her creativity into various outlets, finding solace and healing in expression. Her books, including "Most Likely The Road We Left Behind" and "Surviving in The Kitchen," reflect her resilience and serve as testaments to her journey of self-discovery.

 

In addition to her literary endeavors, Amanda is dedicated to raising awareness about human trafficking and supporting survivors. Through her podcasts, "The Survivors" and "Growth from Darkness," she amplifies the voices of fellow survivors and provides valuable insights into trauma recovery.

 

Amanda's story is a testament to the power of resilience, forgiveness, and the human spirit. Despite facing unimaginable hardships, she emerged stronger and more determined than ever. Her journey serves as a beacon of hope for survivors everywhere, reminding us that healing is possible and that our past does not define our future.

 

In conclusion, Amanda Blackwood's story is one of triumph over trauma. Her resilience, courage, and unwavering spirit serve as an inspiration to all who have faced adversity. Through her art, writing, and advocacy, Amanda continues to make a profound impact, leaving a legacy of hope and empowerment for generations to come.



Transcipt for Episode:


Michelle Henderson :

I am Michelle in today's episode, promises Hope and Inspiration with our incredible guest, Amanda Blackwood, a survivor of human trafficking. Amanda shares her journey with a touch of humor, steering clear of what she fondly calls trauma, vomiting. Join us as Amanda discusses life post-trauma, overcoming challenges and the transformative power of forgiveness as an accomplished artist, author, and podcast host. Amanda story is one, a triumph tune in to hear her insights on resilience, relationships, and fighting back for a better life. Now, as we talk about her books, I feel like it's very important to talk about because a portion of Amanda's book cells goes toward combining, I'm sorry, combating human trafficking. So it is such for a good call. So make sure that you go to Amazon. She's got so many books there and buy one. Alright, so let's hear about her story and get inspired, and I can't wait to hear about her story. Hello. Hello, Amanda.


Amanda Blackwood :

Hello. It's so nice to be with you, Michelle.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, I am honored that you were here because you really have a story, an inspirational story that will make anybody just say, I can do it. I can find the courage. If Amanda did, I can do it as well. So to get started, why don't you go ahead and talk about your past and then we'll go for the past and talk about your recovery and then we'll go on from there. Okay.


Amanda Blackwood :

So most people who have experienced human trafficking have experienced some sort of early childhood trauma and abuse of their own, and I grew up in this really tumultuous environment where my mother used medications to try to control us, including medications that we didn't necessarily need. So I was put on things illegally when I was about four. My father was physically violent, my mother was mentally and emotionally abusive, and my brother was my first molester. That was my entire immediate family. So I grew up in this environment where my dad was in the military. We were moving every few years. I didn't really bond with people, I didn't build these connections and this was always lacking in my life. So when I got to be an adult, I had already been running away from home quite a lot and I was trafficked three different times, completely unrelated in completely different parts of the world. A lot of people have this idea that human trafficking only happens to people under the age of 18. It's like they think that there's a magic wand that when you hit 18 you're no longer susceptible to this type of abuse. That's because that's what we talk about the most here in the us. But if you go to a reputable source to find the definition of human trafficking, I go to the Department of Homeland Security. Their definition is the use of force fraud or coercion to obtain commercial sex acts or labor from another person. There's no mention of transportation even though in our heads we think of trafficking as being the same thing as being in traffic. So human smuggling and human trafficking are two completely separate issues that oftentimes overlap, but both need to be addressed separately. It also doesn't mention anything about money, which means prostitution does not equal human trafficking and vice versa. And there's no mention of age. One quarter of all victims are under the age of 18. That means the majority of human trafficking victims are over 18. The oldest person in recent years here in Colorado to be pulled out of trafficking was actually in her seventies. The youngest was three months old. The numbers are so completely all over the place. Another idea that we have is that it only happens to girls. It's 46% boys and men. So there's all these numbers and stuff that are jumbled up in the atmosphere when it comes to the world of human trafficking, but we focus on what can be most sensationalized. So my story doesn't make sense to a lot of people who don't understand that about trafficking. Trafficking happens about one to 2% by kidnapping. The majority of trafficking is done by people who are already in some sense of control over another person's life. These are parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, boyfriends, girlfriends. In my case, when I was 18, my boyfriend was a man who was more than twice my age. Can you say daddy issues? Right? And he loaned me out to a friend of his for a birthday party in Las Vegas for 52 hours. When I got out of there, I ran for the hills. I looked for any way out that I could possibly find, and I bounced around for a while, found myself in Florida, and my plan was I wanted to stay with my dad's mother. I wanted a chance to get to know my grandmother. I never really knew her, so it was going to go down there and stay with her. And I got all the way down to the Daytona Beach bus station. I spent every penny that I had trying to get there. I had $5 left in my pocket and I called them up. It was about 10 30 at night and I said, hi, I'm here. I'm ready for you to come and get me from the bus station if you've got a moment, please. It was kind of scary. And her husband, my dad's stepfather, answered the phone and said, we're not coming to get you. You're on your own. Good luck. So here it is, kind of late and a young couple. He was in his early twenties and she was 15. She looked closer to 18. They found me crying on the curb and they told me that they had a place for me to stay until I could get back on my feet. But what they really meant was they had a place for me to stay until they found the highest bidder and they sold me to a guy named Esteban. Thankfully, I'm a child of the eighties and I grew up watching this wonderful TV show called MacGyver, and I swear to you, I will always be in love with Richard Dean Anderson. I have to apologize to my husband for that. The man could fix anything with a paperclip and a rubber band, loved MacGyver. And while I was trapped in this room, I thought to myself, what would MacGyver do? And I don't want to go into too many details, but TV of the eighties and nineties is what saved my life in that experience. I got out, I left Florida and I was determined to never see my grandmother again. I ended up all the way out in California because that was as far as I could get without having a passport, and I started over yet again, I had kept on starting over in my life. I wanted to become somebody important and by important, I didn't see myself as having the ability of being truly important in the world. So I wanted to be an assistant to somebody important because vicariously through them, then that would mean that I was important.

If their importance hinged on my ability to manage their schedule, that would make me important. Instead, I was on Alias and Will and Grace and I modeled for Harley Davidson. I did a lot of really cool stuff out there. Never did find that role as an assistant. I became a mall cop for a while. Within five months, I had busted open a major embezzlement ring and I had taken over as the director of public safety and security for six different properties in LA County. I got an $11,000 a year raise after my first year on the job. I got raises for all of my employees and I felt like I was really establishing myself. I finally had my first apartment by myself. I even had a cat. That's when you know you've made it. You've got your own pet, right?


Michelle Henderson :

Absolutely.


Amanda Blackwood :

And during all of this, when I moved out to California, it was 2004 and that's when internet dating really started to become a big thing. And I met a man who lived really, really far away and we already knew that we weren't ever going to be able to be together because he had his established life. I was still trying to establish my life, but he was a safe person for me to talk to, and I told him pretty much everything. I told him all about my past. I told him all about my day. I told him what I had for breakfast. We talked about everything almost every single day, and we got to know each other over this period of seven years. And after seven years with him watching me climb up through the ranks and mall security of all things and really working hard, he had come out to visit me. I had gone to visit him after seven years. He asked me to marry him and moved to Scotland, the land of kings and queens and castles and romance and what every little girl dreams of. And I moved out there, got my fiance visa. It took him seven years to get me there. It took him seven days to start trafficking me.

I was there for 152 days. I nearly took my own life. I was nearly killed. I had a kidney infection so severe that I missed my emergency flight out, that I spent what little money I had on. I lost everything. So I thought I lost 78 pounds in five months. I lost my dignity, my self-respect and my will to live. But through a miracle, I was able to get out of there. I did survive all of this. If you're going to fail at something, at least fail at that. Right? Right.


Michelle Henderson :

Absolutely.


Amanda Blackwood :

Yeah. And when I got out, I got all the way back to the states. I thought it was over. I was done. It's time to start over again. I can go back into what I knew I could go back to not necessarily my old job, but maybe something similar. Every single time I got a new job, this man would attack me by finding out who my bosses were and sending photos and videos of the events that happened to these people and saying, I wouldn't want this working for me, would you? I'd lose my job. I'd lose friends. I lost respect. I mean, I gained the weight back pretty quickly, but that's about all I gained back,


Michelle Henderson :

Right?



Amanda Blackwood :

That was about it. And it was really tough trying to start over amid all of this turmoil. I bounced around for a long time. I kept on trying to run from the past. I had really short hair at the time, so I grew my hair out. I tried to change the color of my hair, I changed my style of dress. I changed where I was going. I changed the car that I drove. I changed everything about me trying to go into hiding, and it just didn't work. One day I looked through the peephole because I heard a loud sound outside, and that was him banging on the neighbor's door. He had come over looking for me. He had my address off by one number, and I moved again and again and again, and it just didn't stop. And eventually in 2016, I packed up a U-Haul with all of my belongings and my cats and I drove from California to Colorado to really start over.

And in 2019, the bottom fell out from under me. I found out that since he couldn't find me in California, he'd given up on that prospect. And instead he made me famous on a pornography website. And he included all of my social media information for people to be able to find me and follow me. And at first, I wanted to go into hiding. I started shutting everything down. I started getting rid of social media accounts. I deleted my Twitter. I deleted Facebook, just getting rid of whatever I could. And then I stopped one day and I thought to myself, it's never going to stop if I keep trying to hide. So if people are going to find me, I need them to know why.

I went into therapy in a year and a half. We made so much progress that I wrote my autobiography. Finally, I wrote the entire thing in 30 days, starting from when I was four. I started painting. I started cooking more. All of these creative outlets. It was so helpful. And my therapist was just absolutely amazing. But an anti-trafficking organization that I paired up with set me up with pro bono legal services to be able to fight all of this stuff on all these pornography pages. And I felt like I had a sense of dignity back. My voice started out really tiny, like a little bitty squeaky mouse. I found out that there was a lion in my lungs crying to get out, and I haven't stopped talking about it since.


Michelle Henderson :

Well, and I am so glad because I think the more people that are educated about what really goes on behind closed doors, and that is because everybody hates to talk about it, but I feel like people need to be educated. And if they are a victim of this, know how to survive. And I love to see the courageousness in you and the fighting spirit, and I know that you really had to fight to continue to fight that battle. Whenever somebody asks you who you are today, how would you describe yourself?


Amanda Blackwood :

I'm a warrior.


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah,


Amanda Blackwood :

Absolutely. I had somebody mention, had somebody mention the other day that they believed that if they could ascribe one word to me, it would be, what was it that she said, rescuer? And I said, that's not it at all. I'm not a rescuer, I'm a reacher.


Michelle Henderson :

And I think that's the result of helping other people through this because like you said, a lot of people really don't understand what trafficking is. And my mother was a middle school counselor and she told me some of the stories that she heard about brothers and sisters and families. And so it does go on, but I think, again, it's being so ignored. And I love that you found therapy that you found writing about your story. And so let's bring up some books that I found on your website. There are so many more though, and it just, I'm just going at all. I'm thinking, how does she have time to write every single book? But you know what, again, it's a lot of therapy. Now, if you had to choose your favorite book, not only it may not be on the screen, which one is your favorite? Is Your Heart Is Your Baby?


Amanda Blackwood :

I actually have three favorites All three of them are on the screen. And how perfect they're all lined up together.


Michelle Henderson :

Okay, which ones


Amanda Blackwood :

My number one favorite is Most Likely The Road We Left Behind. And this is partially because it's not my story at all. It is my mom's mother who in the book, she's portrayed as a wing walker in the 1930s and forties. And for the people who don't know, there's a little biplane on the book cover. And a wing walker was somebody who would climb out of their seat while the plane was in flight and do acrobatics across the wings of the plane. So she would do splits, hang upside down underneath it. She would climb up on the top of it and stand there with her arms straight out to her side and just walk back and forth while the plane's flying at a hundred miles an hour.

And I had to tell her story. My grandmother was this incredible, beautiful woman. She was five foot 11, which was unheard of for a woman in the 1940s, in the 1930s. And her first love was not my grandfather. So of course, the book stirred up a lot of emotions in the family, had some controversy there, but it's actually based on her true story and what happened to their relationship because even she didn't know why it didn't work out until very late in life. And she revealed the story to me in little nuggets when I was in my twenties and thirties. And I love her story so much that I needed her to have a really positive ending and I couldn't wait to write this book. So I sat down to write this one and it took me, what was it, completely, I think two weeks to write the whole thing.

And I just love it. It was such a work of passion for me. My other two favorites would be Custom Justice, which is my full autobiography, and that's the book that I wrote in December of 2020 at the end of my therapy. And the reason I love that one so much isn't because it's about me, but rather because I gave the essence the trauma, its own physical body so that I could set it down on a shelf and walk away from it. And the other one is my most recent book, surviving in The Kitchen. This is my first cookbook. I mentioned something about doing all this creative stuff to help you get through. Well, I painted the book cover for the road We left behind. I posed for the book cover for Custom Justice, and I cooked for the cover for Surviving in the Kitchen, surviving in the kitchen, recipes for Life, love and a Full Stomach, and it's dedicated to my amazing husband. I met him one month after my autobiography was published. I have a lot of my favorite recipes in there. I cook all the time. We rarely ever go out because having that sense of a need for control is such a strong trauma response in people. We need to have something creative to be able to channel that need for control because we control so few things in our actual life.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, I absolutely love it. Now, I do want to talk about the book. Whenever we were setting up this podcast, the schedule and everything, I said, which book do you want me to read? And you told me to read the Unlikely, and so I did, and I'm going, oh my gosh. So I've got to ask you. You do have the cats in there. Okay. So you already told me that you're like your character because of all the cats or the two cats that are in it. So do you feel like you created yourself in the story? Are you the character, the main character?


Amanda Blackwood :

She was based on who I would've been if the rumors and lies about me had been true. And I hated the character so much that as you read, I tried to get rid of her and it didn't work. And that's when I realized she became me. And from then on, it is me. It is my own honest backstory. Anytime she has any kind of a flashback to her past, she's actually seeing my past.


Michelle Henderson :

And I found it, and I was going to bring that up as well, because at the very beginning you could tell that she is putting that wall up around her and she's saying, I don't want anybody in. I don't want anybody in because the trust issue and then I'm not going to give it away. So at the very end, she begins to realize, you know what? I need people for survival. And so I loved how you really made her transition herself through life. And so to me, I thought, oh my. So even though she's not really likable at the beginning, very, you can resonate with her because everybody goes through a period of time in their life like that. So yeah, so I commend you for the book and for really putting your heart into it. And I love the two cats. Thank


Amanda Blackwood :

You. Oh my gosh. They were so much fun to add into the story. Their personalities, one of them has passed on now. Oliver passed away, and they are named after my actual cats, and I do still have Cooper Cooper's my old man. He is toothless and sweet as ever.


Michelle Henderson :

I love it. I love it. I thought, oh my gosh. Yeah, that's how, and we never know when we're in the situation of keeping our babies safe. I'm talking about our fur babies, and she risked her life several times for them. Okay, so do you want to tell people, I don't want to give it away. I know authors go. I only want to tell just a little bit. Can you tell people what it's about?


Amanda Blackwood :

So it is a post-apocalyptic adventure of a woman who has made some questionable life decisions and bases a lot of them on past trauma. She has to move beyond her trauma to survive the current trauma, but she has to learn how to depend on other people. My favorite character other than the main character is Ben. In the third chapter, she meets this band who is a war vet with a prosthetic leg, and that comes into play several times. It's hilarious and frightening all at the same time, and he's just such a great guy. There's a story that he tells really in their introduction, and that story is a true story that a man who was driving me from a hotel to the airport back when I was a flight attendant, he was just looking for a way to break the silence for a moment. It was just he and I, the rest of the crew was staying behind. I was getting switched to a different flight, and on the way there, he told me that story and I said, are you kidding me? And at the very end of me asking, are you kidding me? He's like, didn't you get anything from that story? I had to put this story in the book. I asked him, I said, would it be okay if I take this story and write it down? He says, I would be honored.

I sent him a copy of the


Michelle Henderson :

Book, and I liked him as well because he was also going through post-traumatic syndrome from being in the war, and so it really made him a relatable character at the same time. Okay. Let's switch to your podcast. What inspiration is behind? And not only do you have one, but you have two.


Amanda Blackwood :

I actually have four now.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, do you really? Oh my gosh. Okay. So what I have on the screen is the survivors, and also that's a phobia. Can you talk about these two and then you can tell us about the other ones.


Amanda Blackwood :

So the survivors has morphed a lot from when I first started it back in 2020. So that was when I was still going through all of my therapy and everything. When everything shut down because of Covid, I lost my sense of community. We had a group of survivors I was meeting with once a week. I had nowhere to go, and I had nowhere to throw my voice out. Somebody told me that I should start a podcast, and so for the first season, it was really just me throwing my voice out at the wall and seeing what would stick. The second season, I had no idea what I was going to do with it, so I read my full autobiography for that entire season of the podcast. One chapter at a time while I was doing that is when I got the new idea for changing it to the survivors. It was originally

Amanda Blackwood the Survivor.

It's not about Me. I learned that the hard way, but my story isn't even about me. My story is about the other people who are impacted by the story of survival. So now on that podcast, I interview other authors who have written about having overcome their own traumas because I want to help to uplift their voices. I want them to be heard. It's about all of us. Every single time somebody reaches out to me and says, I heard this episode and I have the same issue that they had, and it's nice to know that they were able to get through it, I'm going to get the help I need. Every time I hear that, it blows my mind.

Then I started Growth from Darkness, which was early this year with a co-host of mine from Australia. She and I break down all the different trauma reactions, one in each episode we talk about what it is, what usually causes it, what the long-term consequences are of not dealing with it. There are long-term term consequences, and then how to fight back against it in healthier ways so that you can help to retrain your brain so you're not reinforcing these bad behaviors. Then I've got, that's a phobia, and I hilariously try to pronounce the phobias, and they are really difficult to pronounce, especially for somebody with dyslexia.


Michelle Henderson :

Yes, I understand.


Amanda Blackwood :

And then I talk about what that phobia is. So the episodes are only about maybe two to three minutes tops, but they're really short, really easy, and I come out with one a week, and the last one is one that I just started. I just got the website for, just got the whole thing going. It's called Pod Zeal, and it's for all those podcasters out there that have a message and they feel like their message isn't quite being heard. It's a different version of the survivors, basically. So on Pod Zeal, I have different podcast hosts and give me a five to seven minute video kind of talking about what their podcast is about, who they're hoping to reach, and just kind of maybe a story or two from their podcast, maybe talk about a guest that they had that made an impact somewhere.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, wow.


Amanda Blackwood :

Again, short episodes, but again, raising up the voices of others who still need to be heard.


Michelle Henderson :

So each one has its own purpose, just like each book basically.


Amanda Blackwood :

Absolutely.


Michelle Henderson :

All right. So is there anything that I did not bring up that you want to make sure that we talk about before we bring up the will?


Amanda Blackwood :

The only thing that I can think of is if you have questions about human trafficking, if anybody has questions, go to a reputable source. You can consider me to be a reputable source because if I don't know, I'm not going to make it up. I'm going to look up the numbers and find out for you. But go to the Department of Homeland Security. This is not something that you should ever Google or look up on Wikipedia. These are fallible resources run by human hands. Look for the Department of Homeland Security or something along those lines.

Michelle Henderson :

I love it. Okay, so is there any, the one thing that I did not ask, do you have an inspiration statement that you could give? You told us your story, which is wonderful inspiration, but is there an inspiration statement that you remember to help you survive and that someone else may need to hear?


Amanda Blackwood :

I have a few. Let's see if I can narrow it down.


Michelle Henderson :

I know it's always so hard.


Amanda Blackwood :

I would say we have to stop telling ourself false things. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger, is a lie you've been through. Worse, you'll get through this too, is a lie. We have to understand where we are in our life. We have to give credit to what we're going through and to what we have already been through, but piling up too, stones will create a mountain eventually. You can't climb. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger, is a phrase that was coined in the late 18 hundreds by Frederick Nietzche shortly before he died in an insane asylum. It's okay to let that one go. The truth is that the strength was always within us, each and every single one of us individually. The reason we survived was because we had that will to survive. The strength within us should never be credited to our traumas, to our abusers. They don't deserve that kind of credit. And I know forgiveness is such a dirty word, but that's because we don't truly understand what forgiveness is. If you stepped on my toes in an elevator, you would say, oh, excuse me, I'm sorry. And I would say, oh, that's okay. That's not forgiveness. That's a pardon. Forgiveness is letting go of the chains that bind you to those who hurt you.


Michelle Henderson :

I love it. I love it. Can you say that one more time about what forgiveness is?


Amanda Blackwood :

Forgiveness is breaking the chains and letting go of that, which binds you to the abusers or the abuse.


Michelle Henderson :

I love it. All right. Are you ready for the wheel?


Amanda Blackwood :

I am. I'm excited about it.


Michelle Henderson :

I know it's the famous Wheel and I finally have just called it Inspiration Hour, but I probably need to think of a better name. All right. Let's see. Let's see. Oh, oh, it was kind of on the borderline. I was thinking it was going to be something else. Okay. Yeah, so go back to time, and this doesn't mean your lifetime, it can mean any time. Where would you want or when would you want to go and why?


Amanda Blackwood :

So this actually combines both of those answers. I would go back to 1941 to go watch the film being made. It was called The Lady Eve with Barbara Stanwick and Henry Fonda. It was my favorite movie of all time actually made during World War ii, and I would want to stick around through VE Day because I would want to see the end of World War II and watch the celebrations as they happen.


Michelle Henderson :

It's so interesting you say that because whenever you go to your Facebook account or Instagram, you see yourself in costumes like 1940, 1950s, right, that you love. Is that the era that you really are drawn to?


Amanda Blackwood :

It always has been. In fact, on the cover of my autobiography, I'm wearing this 1940 dress and a necklace. The dress is actually back here behind me. I have a massive of 1940s antiques, dresses, suits, shoes, hats, bags, gloves, all of it. And that's because I used to be a museum guide at the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles. I specialized in the Holocaust exhibit and the Anne Frank exhibit because I wanted to make an impact in the lives of others and have others understand that they have the power to make a difference in maybe not the rest of the world, but one person and to one person. That is the whole world.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, I love it. Okay, well, where can they reach you, Amanda?


Amanda Blackwood :

I'm really easy to find all over social media. I'm on Facebook more than I should be. I'd probably write more than two books a year if I wasn't facebook.com/amanda blackwood survivor. But they can also go to my website, growth from darkness.com, and I have another website that's currently being designed. It is detailed pieces.com.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, I love it. I love it. Alright, everybody, you have heard this wonderful story, this such inspirational story. You are a survivor. Find that courage in you. Find what works for you, find that joy, and if you find that little nugget of joy and you can forgive, you can move on, just like what Amanda has done and make your own memories. Make your own life, design it as an artist would on a canvas. All right, I will see you next week. Everybody. Have a fantastic couple of weeks, and I will see you soon.

 

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