top of page
  • Writer's pictureMichelle Henderson

Everyday Lessons for Extraordinary Living: David McBee


Everyday Lessons
Wisdom of David McBee

Welcome to Inspire Your Essence, where stories of resilience and growth come to light. Today, we're diving into the extraordinary journey of David McBee, a beacon of positivity, self-improvement, and unwavering strength. From battling anger issues to facing a daunting cancer diagnosis, David's story is one of triumph, resilience, and unwavering spirit.

 

David McBee's journey is a testament to the power of personal growth and resilience. His story is one of transformation, from a place of frustration and anger to one of gratitude, hope, and love. Despite facing numerous challenges along the way, David has emerged as a shining example of how adversity can be overcome with the right mindset and determination.

 

David's journey began with a pivotal realization – his anger was not only affecting himself but also his relationships with loved ones. Determined to change, he embarked on a journey of self-improvement, turning to books as his guides. Through daily reading and introspection, David began to implement the lessons he learned, gradually transforming his outlook and behavior.

 

His first book, "Everyday Lessons Every Day," chronicles this transformative journey, offering insights and practical wisdom for readers seeking personal growth and positive change. Through candid reflections and heartfelt anecdotes, David shares the lessons he learned and the profound impact they had on his life.

 

One of the key themes of David's journey is the importance of love and connection. From cherishing moments with loved ones to fostering deeper connections with those around him, David emphasizes the transformative power of love in overcoming life's challenges.

 

In addition to his personal journey, David is also a prolific author and entrepreneur. His children's series, "DJ's Off-Road Adventures," combines his passion for off-roading with valuable life lessons for young readers. Through engaging storytelling and vibrant illustrations, David inspires children to face their fears, embrace challenges, and celebrate the joys of life's journey.

 

As an executive producer of Sim Amplify TV and a digital marketing expert, David is also making waves in the marketing landscape, providing a platform for marketing leaders to share their insights and expertise.

 

However, David's journey took an unexpected turn when he received a cancer diagnosis. Despite the initial shock and uncertainty, David approached his diagnosis with characteristic optimism and resilience. Through surgery, treatment, and ongoing management, David has embraced life with a renewed sense of purpose and gratitude.

 

His message of resilience, hope, and the transformative power of love continues to inspire countless individuals facing their own challenges. Whether through his books, speaking engagements, or online presence, David's unwavering spirit and positive outlook serve as a guiding light for others on their own journeys of self-discovery and growth.

 

In conclusion, David McBee's journey is a testament to the resilience of the human spirit and the transformative power of love, positivity, and personal growth. From overcoming anger to confronting cancer, David's story reminds us that no obstacle is insurmountable with the right mindset and determination. As we navigate life's challenges, may we draw inspiration from David's journey and embrace each day with gratitude, hope, and unwavering resilience.



Transcript of Video:


Michelle Henderson :

Welcome to Inspire Your Essence. I'm Michelle. And our guest today is David McBee, a self-improvement enthusiast who overcame anger issues through reading. Despite a recent cancer diagnosis, he embraces life and integrating health, spirituality, and positivity. An accomplished digital marketing expert. David is also the author of Everyday Lessons Every Day and Children's series DJ's Off-Road Adventures. As executive producer of Sim Amplify tv, he provides a platform for marketing leaders join us for a powerful hour as David shares his inspiring journey from conquering personal challenges to making a significant impact in the digital marketing landscape. So let's bring him on to hear about his story. I am so excited to hear about it. How are you doing, David?


David McBee:

I'm doing good. I'm doing great. Thank you for having me. I appreciate it.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, absolutely. And I know I just absolutely. You've got a inspirational story that I am excited to share with everybody. But before we get started, I do have a couple of questions that I feel like I need to ask you. So in five words, describe yourself, and this can be separate words, it doesn't have to be in a sentence, but describe yourself using five different words.


David McBee:

Well, let's start with grateful. That's my number one word. Positive, hopeful, inspiring. I'd like to think, is that four? Yes. And one more. And bald


Michelle Henderson :

Involved.


David McBee:

Bald.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, bald. I had to make sure I heard it correctly. Bald? Yes. Okay, I love that one. Okay. Now use five different words that how people would describe you.


David McBee:

Grateful, everyone knows that's my superpower. So that's probably the first thing. At least I hope that's the first thing they think of with me. High energy, which I think is two words, but we're going to call it one. We're going to


Michelle Henderson :

Bundle. Absolutely


David McBee:

Fun. Hopefully. I'm positive. I'm going to go with positive and bald.


Michelle Henderson :

Alright. And it's so interesting because I got something a little bit from that. Are you a rule breaker as well? I


David McBee:

Am definitely a rule breaker. And as a podcast host who does very dry topics, sometimes we do ad tech and things, I'm always hoping my guests will bring a little bit of humor to the interviews, so I try to do that as well.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, absolutely, absolutely. Okay, so we have so much to cover and I just kind of want to take the puzzle pieces of your life. I know people go, don't think of my life as a puzzle piece, but we're going to look at puzzle pieces and look at what you have accomplished, which is a great deal. So what I want to bring on first are the books that you have created. And they're so different, but they're like at the same time. But let's first bring up your one book, the first book that you wrote, I believe, if I'm correct on that. But it's everyday lessons every day. So I loved it. And why I loved it is because I felt like I was reading your journal. I felt like I was invading because you gave so much of yourself whenever you wrote that book. What inspired you to say, you know what? I need to get this out. I need to write this book. So what inspired you to write?


David McBee:

Well, first of all, it kind of was a journal. Honestly, I had taken it upon myself to go on this journey of self-improvement because as you know, reading the first chapter, things were not amazing. At my house, I have very short temper. Everything irritated me. I just would let the littlest things just put me over the edge and it was really difficult for my family to be around me. And so there's a whole lot more to that story. But to get to the point I said, I think I'm going to lose my family if I don't do something. And I had always used books to help me in my career back in the day. I read Think and Grow Rich and how a Man Think If and how do I friends and influence people, things that made me a better speaker, manager, entrepreneur, things like that.

So I said, well, I'm going to read relationship books and see if that helps me. And so I made a commitment to read every day, which I didn't always follow that commitment, but I got pretty close and I would take the lessons from those books and apply 'em to my life. And I guess I just started realizing, I'm going to document this a little bit. I'm going to say, okay, here's something really crappy that I did to my 12-year-old daughter. I just made her feel terrible because I lost my temper. And then here's a lesson I learned from a book, which was maybe I'm thinking off the top of my head, apologize first, always be the first to apologize even if you really, really want that apology from the other person. And so I would implement those lessons and then write about the outcome. And I didn't honestly know if it was going to be a book I'd published one day, but when I got done with it, I was like, this is what a lot of people probably need to hear. I know I'm not the only one out there who could benefit from getting into the habit of reading every day. And reading absolutely positively impacted my life in such a powerful way. I just wish everyone would make it something that they do. So that's why I decided to publish the book


Michelle Henderson :

And absolutely, and like you said, it was a journal. So not only did you know that you had anger issues, but you knew you really looked in and you looked inside yourself and thought, what can I do to change that? So you really embraced yourself and were very honest with yourself, which a lot of people have difficult time with, but that's how you heal and everything. I'm going to tell you the three chapters that I've read that really sang my name and it really resonated with me. And the one chapter that I really liked was Cherish Her.


David McBee:

Why did you like that one so much?


Michelle Henderson :

Because, and it's so true because whenever you look at, whenever you have a pet, a dog, and whenever you walk in the door and the dog is so excited to see you and you just know that you're loved, but a lot of times when my husband walks in, I'm here on the computer, hi hun, that kind of thing, just hi and not really stopping everything and going up and say, I'm so glad you made it back home because you never know his life could end and he may not make it back home. So that really resonated with me that we need to be the same energy as a dog. And I love how you did this with your teenagers and they're going, you thought that they were going to think craziness with you, but no, they, oh man, I


David McBee:

Hopped up, I ran up to 'em, I hugged them, I wagged my butt a little bit. They were like, what is wrong with you? But they felt my energy and they just laughed and it just made their day. So every once in a while I'll still do that. In fact, I'm going to do that today when my wife gets home.


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah. Hey, there you go. And I like how you said she thought there was something wrong. I guess the behavior of yours was a little bit different. And I would do probably the same thing if my husband changed his behavior, I'd be going, okay, what happened? What's wrong with what happened?


David McBee:

If just the one takeaway people get from my book, then it was worth every penny at cost to publish it and all the work I put into it. I challenge your listeners when your loved one gets home today, hop up, you haven't seen 'em in a year and just love on them and it'll just make their evening.


Michelle Henderson :

Yes, and absolutely, absolutely. For some reason, it also brings true whenever you go to work because there's that gratitude whenever you're talking to a boss, that's very difficult. Just saying hello and making that eye contact. It's almost like saying, I appreciate being here today showing that gratitude and the number one thing. Alright, so there's another chapter that I do want to talk about is be Vacation Dad. And the one reason why I really like that is because, again, it rings so true because see, whenever I'm talking all your chapters, a lot of people can resonate. They can see themselves in it. So whenever we go vacationing, my husband, he doesn't like to spend money, he likes to hold onto it, which is a great thing to be, but when you're on vacation, you got to let down things you got to really let go. And you did whenever, was it Disney World that you went to? I can't remember.


David McBee:

I know it was, I'm not sure which one I wrote about, but there was the very first time I bought Fast Passes at one of the theme parks. Yes, it was so expensive, but the lines were so long and this was when Fast Passes were kind of a novelty. They were new and I mean, my kids just lit up and it just made the vacation so amazing.


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah. Okay, because I talked about the chapters, which one was your favorite chapter of your book?


David McBee:

It's been a long time since I've read my book, but I can tell you one of the chapter about driving in the left lane, I think. Oh, okay. It was near the end. It was called I Am Changed or Am I, and basically the concept is, and maybe you haven't gotten there yet, you haven't quite finished the book. Oh


Michelle Henderson :

No, I've read it. No, I've read that one. Oh,


David McBee:

You did fin it. Exactly, yes. So one of the things that absolutely set me off was when I was in the left lane and people were going slow and I had to pass 'em on the right. I mean, even to this day, that's still, it's like, all right, not going to let it bother me, but just move over. I just want to go by. And I remember one day I was in the left lane and I was moving pretty good, and I saw this car in my rear view mirror coming up on me really fast, and I got out of his way as fast as I could, and he shot by me, I mean really, really fast. And I thought, what a jerk, why that's dangerous, why they got to go so fast? And then I thought, maybe they're going to the hospital, maybe their daughter is sick at home and they're trying to get to them. Maybe they have a really good reason for driving that fast. I've done it and I thought I had a good reason. So now whenever I experience someone driving terrible or whatever, I think, well, maybe they have a really good reason for doing that. And I try to imagine the best in people instead of the worst.


Michelle Henderson :

Absolutely. Oh, I just love it. Alright, so I just lost my train of thought I was going to ask you. Oh, okay. So anger. So the whole book is based upon you dealing with anger and the different lessons and everything. Where do you think your anger came from?


David McBee:

I think it came from my own frustrations that I wasn't doing better in my life. You described me as this successful guy and frankly from any point of view, I am, but I never felt like it was enough. I always wanted more, whether it was more money or a better career or more notoriety, whatever it might be, I just always wanted more and I never felt like I was achieving the very best I could achieve. So it was probably something to do with my own feelings of inadequacy.


Michelle Henderson :

I see. Alright. And in your book you also disclosed that you would write things that you were working on on your wrist. Do you have anything written on today?


David McBee:

I actually finally broke down and got a tattoo. I don't know if you can see that, but it says WW heart D. So it's similar to what would Jesus do, but in my case, it's what would love do. And the concept is that in any situation that you're in, either you're fighting with someone on Twitter or you're in the left lane and trying to get out of the way or you're at the grocery store and people are being jerks. If you ask yourself, well, what would love do in this moment? You're always going to make the best decision for yourself, for your community, for the people around you. What would love do? The answer to that is a guiding principle that if we all followed that, can you imagine what the world would be like if we all followed that guidance? So that's the one I finally broke down and tattooed on my wrist because it meant the most to me.


Michelle Henderson :

Well, that way you don't have to think each day. And really, and I love that because it's so, and I don't want to say general, but it goes with different situations. It's one that will carry through a lifetime basically. And I feel like, let's go back with your accomplishment because I feel like you have accomplished so much and I think a lot of, like you said, just feel like they haven't done enough. And I just commend you with your message and everything. So let's go ahead and talk about your next book series and of course being an educator, I love this. So why did you come up? Oh, let me go ahead and read it. For the people who are just listening, it's DJs. Okay. It's the series and there's different ones. It's Faces is Fear, girls Rock and Better Together. So looking at the whole series, why did you decide to use a Jeep? Is it a Jeep?


David McBee:

Well, if Jeep calls with their lawyers, it's not technically a Jeep. Oh,


Michelle Henderson :

Okay.


David McBee:

It's an off-road vehicle. Oh,


Michelle Henderson :

There you go.


David McBee:

It is inspired by a Jeep because I'm a huge Jeep fanatic. I've been driving Jeeps since I was 16. And the story of how the first book came about is it's kind of fun. I went out to Moab, Utah, which is where all the big off-road obstacles are. It's like the bucket list place for off roaders from all over the world. And I was with some very experienced Jeep people and I wasn't that experienced, even though I've been driving Jeeps my whole life, I hadn't really done anything like that. And they took me on a trail called Hell's Revenge. And the entrance to Hell's Revenge is this, they call it a fin. It's like this big rock that comes out of the ground. The easiest way to explain it is the sand worms from Dune. Oh yes. Imagine trying to drive a Jeep on the back of a sand worm that's frozen.

And so it was like a 70, 80 foot drop on the left, 70, 80 foot drop on the right. And I'm driving up this thing going, what are we doing? Cars are not supposed to be here and it's not flat. So you're doing this the whole way. I had a massive, massive panic attack. I'm shaking retelling the story, that's how much it impacted me. So I put the car in park and I was like, I can't do this. I drove 15 hours for nothing. I got to turn around, I got to go back to Kansas where it's nice and flat and safe. This is not for me. I can't do this. And all my friends just stopped. The guy in the Jeep in front of me got out and he came back. The guys in the Jeep behind me got out and they walked up to me and they're like, I'm standing there looking at him at the driver's, and they're like, you got this, man, take your time.

There's no hurry. Nobody's pressuring you, you're safe. And we just walked through this obstacle. And then over the course of the week, they challenged me to do things that absolutely terrified me. All these huge shelf roads with thousand foot drops and things like this. But it was the greatest week of my life. It was so fantastic to face these fears and have that adrenaline and experience it. And I would get back and I would tell people that story, and somebody was like, you sound like the little engine that could. And I'm like, okay, hang on a second. Maybe there's an idea here. And so I hired an illustrator and sent him my script and my prompts and for you knew it, we had a book and it was all based on DJ facing his fears and his friends coming to his rescue and helping him to overcome those fears.


Michelle Henderson :

Well, and I got to show everybody another picture that I found, I think it was on Instagram, that you went out to schools and actually spoke about it. And being an educator, I remember we would have guest authors that would talk about their books and your book to me, I used to also work with children under the autism spectrum. And believe me, they love anything with wills on it. And so that's why I identified with the story. And I think, you know what, that's another thing that they can read and learn about tribulations and about being brave. But I absolutely love this picture. You are so brave in itself, getting in front of school children at that and presenting your book. So how many years did you go around showing everybody your book?


David McBee:

Well, ironically, I published that book right about the time covid hit. And so it just was an instant failure. I couldn't promote it, I couldn't get out there. So when the mask mandates kind of settled down, I was like, I started calling librarians around my neighborhood and I was like, Hey, just lemme come in. And they're like, what do you charge? I'm like, I don't charge anything. Just let me come read the book. I think, I don't know if you've ever cooked something for someone and you just want to see that look on their face when they take that first bite. That's how I feel about my books. I love hearing that you read my book and that those chapters impacted you so much. That just means so much to me. It means so much more to me than the two or $3 I made on the purchase.

I wanted to go to these schools and I wanted to see these kids' faces when I read them the books. And I'll tell you real quick, one of the most fun things about that is I would show them the cartoon imagery from the book and then I would show them the real life photographs of the Jeep on the mountainside and they would go, oh my gosh. And then some of the teachers thought it was so cool, I would bring my Jeep and I put the eyes in the windshield with a sun visor and the kids would come out and pose with it and take pictures and touch it and climb on it and oh my God, it was just so much fun. Oh


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah. Oh my gosh. That is amazing. See, I mean, it just, you're amazing, all of us. Alright, so let's go ahead and talk about, because I know there are a lot of people out there with a cancer diagnosis. Alright, how did you get your cancer diagnosis and how did you handle it and how are you handling it now?


David McBee:

That's a lot. Okay. Your listeners are like, whoa, 180.


Michelle Henderson :

Yes. Yes. I know. It's hard to get everything. Like I said, you've done so much and you had learned so many lessons. I know that with cancer diagnosis, it's very interesting how people learn so many lessons through the experience.


David McBee:

Yeah, it has been the greatest teacher of my life. It honestly has. So to answer your questions, I had a routine colonoscopy at the age of 51, almost 52, and they found a couple little nodules. It was not colon cancer. They said, I had a clean belly of health there, but there's this little nodule, we're not sure what it is. Let's go check it out. They did a biopsy on it and it turned out it was something called neuroendocrine cancer. Neuroendocrine cancer is kind of rare, not so rare that you've never heard of it. Steve Jobs had neuroendocrine cancer, Aritha Franklin had neuroendocrine cancer, but you don't hear that. If you were to Google it right now, you would hear that or you would read that Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer. Well, that's not entirely true. He died of neuroendocrine cancer in his pancreas.

So it is a cancer that can be in any of your endocrine systems. And if it had just been in my colon, they could have cut it out, have been done. Easy peasy, 97% survival rate, but it was stage four, it had metastasized to my liver where I had another dozen tumors in my liver, small tumors the size of a pea or a grape. And that was bad news. That was really bad news. That was like, you've got x number of years left news. This isn't something we can fix. So then, sorry, I need a breath.


Michelle Henderson :

That's okay.


David McBee:

They took me in for surgery, cut out all the tumors that they could, they literally shaved off. And any part of the, I lost 25% of my liver that day. My gallbladder, about a foot of my colon, including the valve between the small and the large intestines, which is a very valuable valve by the way. And so my plumbing's been a mess ever since. But they got what they thought was all of it, including the tumors that were deep in the liver. They stuck a needle in and electrified them, kind of just melted them. And so they're like, you're good, you're all set. And I'm like, wow, that was the easiest cancer diagnosis story of all time. And then three months later we're doing routine scans and there's some more tumors in my liver. So I was in denial really. I thought, okay, I'm done with this.

But the reality is I wasn't done. And this is the kind of cancer that I may never, ever, ever be done with. It's the kind of cancer you live with. And luckily, luckily it was caught early and it's the kind of cancer that I possibly could live with for 20 or 30 years. If I take the right medications and I do all the things in my daily life, I tell every cancer diagnose that they need to pick up a book called Radical Remissions. Radical Remissions has 10 steps that you can take in your everyday life to ward off the cancer beyond what you're doing with your doctors. And so I am about a year and a half in now, I'm still walking around with these tumors in my liver. They have some impact, like I said, on my plumbing. But other than that, I feel great.

And I have a scan coming up here in about a week, and I'm a little nervous about it. It's been six months since I've had a scan. So how I'm dealing with it is I've just changed so many things in my life. And the number one thing is truly overcoming those anger issues. There's a lot of research that shows that stress impacts your endocrine system and this isn't the case for everyone. And I have to be very careful and when I say this because I don't want people to think that they can get cancer from stress, but in my case, I believe my stress truly triggered this cancer inside of my body. And so I try to live a stress-free life in order to minimize its strength and growth and overcome it along with several other things that I do every single day that are very different from the life I led before cancer.


Michelle Henderson :

And so whenever you found out about it, how has your family coping it with you? What has changed there?


David McBee:

It actually brought my entire family much closer together. We were close anyway. I've been married to my wife 25 years and I call it the love of a lifetime, but cancer just actually made it stronger. It said, Hey, I could lose you and we could lose each other. And when you put that on the table, it just makes you embrace the one you love even more. My daughter, she's a little clone of me, super positive attitude, everything's going to be okay. Sun's shiny, rose clothed glasses all the time. She was like, you're going to be fine, dad. You're going to be fine. If anybody can beat it, it's you. I don't think she shed a tear. Right. My son is an empath. He really, really feels things. So he had a little harder time with it, but overall, it's been really good for our family. I'm like one of those cancer patients that you're going to talk to that's not mad at his cancer. I'm grateful for all the lessons that it has taught me and the gifts that it's brought my life.


Michelle Henderson :

Well, thank you for sharing. And I know it is very difficult because it is such an emotional subject and I know again, you're going to help so many people with your inspiration while you were talking. Okay. I wanted to write, Dan, actually, I got six words. Six words to describe you from my point of view and from our conversation. Okay. So warrior, definitely a warrior. You're a teacher. You give, give, give, give. Even though it's very emotional, that's what you're giving us right now. You're very spiritual, inspirational, and then love. Okay, so I had five words and then I figured out, oh, I need to put love in as well. And that's what radiates from you.


David McBee:

Those are really nice things to hear. Thank you. You forgot bald though.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh yeah, that's true. And bald and very bald. No, it's okay. But you got lots of hair right here, right on your chin.


David McBee:

Yes. I'm compensating my face. Face. Yeah. Yeah,


Michelle Henderson :

That's exactly right. That's exactly right. Are you ready for the last question?


David McBee:

Are we there already? We're all already there at the last question. Just is so much fun. I don't want to go.


Michelle Henderson :

Well, and you are not yet. You're not yet. So the question, and then I'm going to bring up one more thing. Are you ready?


David McBee:

Ready.


Michelle Henderson :

I feel like again, I know it's so much fun to talk and have a conversation and sometimes it is hard to come to a close just like reading a good book. Right,


David McBee:

Right.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh my goodness. Okay.


David McBee:

My favorite child, favorite childhood toy.


Michelle Henderson :

Yeah, I don't, I'm not going to put that. What was your favorite childhood toy and why?


David McBee:

Man, I got to go with Hot Wheels. I had the best hot wheel collection with the Orange Track and we would go out and we would run that track out in the front yard, down the street like Oh wow. I just loved racing Hot Wheels. It was the best. And I would imagine myself being in the driver's seat of the car and just also then I had little Toy Jeeps and things like that and I would play with them in the dirt and things. Oh, you can dream and have so many experiences with wheels, I still buy them to this day.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh wow. So you're a collector of Hot Wheels?


David McBee:

Well actually I buy all the Off-Road vehicles, the Broncos, the Jeeps, the trucks, and I keep 'em in my Jeep. And when kids say I see kids pointing at my Jeep all the time, I always give 'em a hot wheel when I see 'em.


Michelle Henderson :

Oh, that's so cool. Oh my gosh, thank giving. You're giving so much of yourself. Okay, so is there anything else that we did not bring up that you want to make sure that we get in this episode?


David McBee:

Actually, yeah, actually there's one thing that I think a lot of people are neglecting and that I have come to discover is absolutely vital in all of my cancer research. It's funny, sometimes I feel like I know more than my doctors because they don't have as much time as I do to research cancer. I read or listen to podcasts every single day on the treadmill. So I've got hundreds of hours of knowledge in my head. And one of the things that I've learned that is so simple that everyone could do right now is get more sleep when you are sleeping is the only time that your body is repairing itself. And if you are neglecting that, you are taking away that function. And so these A type personalities that say, I don't need it, I can do a lot on six hours. Like okay, you can to a point.

But even Tony Robbins in his recent book, life Force, he talks about how he used to run, run, run, run. And he'd get as little sleep as he possibly could because he had so many things to do and now he prioritizes sleep. And you absolutely got to get eight hours a night and it can keep you healthy, it can repair anything that's going wrong with you. It reduces stress. It's such a stupid little thing to put my stake in the ground and say this is what you need to do. But it's a little thing we can all change. That can have a huge impact on our health and our mental health as well.


Michelle Henderson :

I absolutely love it and I need to tell my husband what you said because I tend to sleep 10 hours, eight to 10 hours a night and if I don't, I don't function and I am grumpy and I can't think straight. And so I don't know what it is, but I've always, all my life I've had to have eight to 10 hours in evening. Well then you're


David McBee:

So much for bringing that in good health then that's great.


Michelle Henderson :

Absolutely. Absolutely. So where can everybody find you, David? What is your favorite social media where they can find you?


David McBee:

Well, let's go with David mcbe.com. I'm pretty easy to find. I've been in internet marketing, we didn't talk much about that, but that's been my career for the last 20 years. So if you google me or look@davidmcbe.com, you're going to find me pretty easily. All the books are on Amazon, including, well, I got a new one coming out in the spring, so I'm excited about that one. But everything will be on Amazon.


Michelle Henderson :

Okay, excellent. Alright, so everybody, if you enjoy this episode, not only the inspiration we went up and then we went down around like a roller coaster, but if you know somebody who really will just make it their day and their year and their life, please share it with them. Because a lot of people need to be inspired and I think we're lacking a lot of inspiration. You are like David, like a warrior. You're making it every day. I know in his book he talks about having different lessons in a life and sometimes you get tired of saying, okay, there's another lesson. But it is so true. You grow so much whenever you go through a tribulation and you get to see what's on the other side. But you got to keep going and find that warrior in you. Alright guys, I will see you next week. Bye.

 


Comments


bottom of page